English II Honors Homework

Date

Today's Lesson

Turned In

What's Ahead....

5/16
Pass back all kinds of papers.

Small group presentations in preparation for Friday's English final. You'll need the following:
  • #2 pencil with eraser
  • blue or black pen
  • a note card (please submit with your name at the top)

2nd Hour--
For Frederick Douglass, focus on the importance of reading and the scene with Mr. Covey.

2nd Hour Reviews
2nd Hour Glass Menagerie
2nd H TEWWG
2nd H Frederick Douglass
Incidents in the Life by Harriet Jacobs
2nd Huck Finn
2nd Great Gatsby
2nd AILD

Final exam this Friday, 5/20


3rd Hour Reviews
3rd H The Glass Menagerie
3rd H TEWWG
3rd H Frederick Douglass
3rd Harriet Jacobs
3rd Huck Finn
3rd The Great Gatsby
3rd AILD
5/13
Review Groups for final exam
  • The Glass Menagerie
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • The Great Gatsby
  • As I Lay Dying

Directions:
1. Go to google docs and open the following template:
"WilcoxReview"
2. Change the title to your hour+the work of literature, for example "2nd hour Their Eyes Were Watching God"
3. make sure I'm invited to view/edit (mwilcox4@gmail.com) & make sure to invite all your members with gmail addresses.
4. Divide all the tasks equally and write your names next your your assignment, for example, "Anna K-characters"
5. Complete your section of the analysis by 8 PM Sunday evening.

Final exam next Friday, 5/20
5/12
AILD SS discussion
AILD SS discussion ?
Final exam next Friday, 5/20
5/11
AILD River Activity

Socratic Seminar discussion ? due tomorrow at the beginning of the hour.

Final exam next Friday, 5/20
5/10
Discuss the ending of the novel.

Reading quiz over AILD.

Semester Final Study Guide

No homework tonight--you'll receive an AILD SS discussion question to work on tomorrow during class. We'll go back to the river crossing and barn-burning scenes Wednesday.

Socratic Seminar over AILD--Thursday and Friday.


5/9
JT--Examine Addie's character through the eyes of her children, husband, and neighbors. What kind of woman is she? (daughter, teacher, wife, mother, neighbor friend, lover, etc.) As you examine her, try to withhold judgment (don't be a Cora Tull). Look at her isolation and solitude, her philosophy of life, etc.
Who is Addie?
Why would anyone choose to marry Anse?
What are her children so different from each other?
What experiences has made her the way she is?


Finish the novel by tomorrow. You'll have a reading quiz tomorrow.

Socratic Seminar over AILD--Thursday and Friday.
5/6
A brief Q&A over the river crossing section. We'll look at it in depth on Tuesday.

Continue reading AILD, pages 166-217 due Monday, 5/9

As I Lay Dying reading schedule:
  • 166-217 due Monday, 5/9
  • finish the novel for Tuesday, 5/10
5/5
JT--As I Lay Dying is the portrait of a family under stress. Which family member do you feel most sorry for? least? Why? Explain. In addition, record a brief summary from last night's reading . What do we learn about the importance of Jewel's horse? How does the deception affect Addie? Why? What does Darl learn about his mother?


Q&A discussion

Homework
Continue tracking and annotating your character. Read the following for tomorrow:
As I Lay Dying
  • 137-165 due Friday, 5/6 (treacherous river crossing scene)
  • 166-217 due Monday, 5/9
  • finish the novel for Tuesday, 5/10
Great Gatsby character sketch/creative writing
As I Lay Dying reading schedule:
  • 137-165 due Friday, 5/6
  • 166-217 due Monday, 5/9
  • finish the novel for Tuesday, 5/10
5/4
Q&A over reading

Specific questions for small groups to answer during class.

For tomorrow, please finalize changes for your GG character sketch and creative writing. Make sure to record page numbers when paraphrasing/providing specific quotations about your character.

AILD--read 105-136 for tomorrow.

As I Lay Dying reading schedule:
  • 105-136 due Thursday, 5/5
  • 137-165 due Friday, 5/6
  • 166-217 due Monday, 5/9
  • finish the novel for Tuesday, 5/10

Final draft of Gatsby character sketch due Thursday, 5/6.
5/3
In your small groups, begin to make some insights about your character.
  • How does he/she respond to the death of Addie?
  • How does your character withstand this finality?
  • What else, if anything, seems to be bothering your character?
  • In addition to answering the aforementioned, list specific statements, observations, animals, or symbols connected to your character. For example Anse seems to obsess about teeth.

Small group discussion/Q&A

For tomorrow, read 65-104 (which is about 20 pages in a novel without so much white space).

As I Lay Dying reading schedule:
  • 65-104 due Wednesday, 5/4 (again, we'll read some in class).
  • 105-136 due Thursday, 5/5
  • 137-165 due Friday, 5/6
  • 166-217 due Monday, 5/9
  • finish the novel for Tuesday, 5/10

Final draft of Gatsby character sketch due Thursday, 5/6.
5/2
JT--Introductory Activity

Modernism

Select a character to track as you read As I Lay Dying

For tomorrow, read 29-64 (begin reading in class today).

As I Lay Dying reading schedule:
  • pages 2-28 due Monday, 5/2
  • pages 29-64 due Tuesday, 5/3 (we'll read as much as we can in class on Monday).
  • 65-104 due Wednesday, 5/4 (again, we'll read some in class).
  • 105-136 due Thursday, 5/5
  • 137-165 due Friday, 5/6
  • 166-217 due Monday, 5/9
  • finish the novel for Tuesday, 5/10

Final draft of Gatsby character sketch due Thursday, 5/6.
4/29
Peer revising--character sketch/creative writing

Final discussion over Gatsby

Begin reading Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, pages 3-28 due Monday. As you read, remember this is modern literature told through the points of view of individual members of the Bundren family, a family under stress due to the dying of Addie Bundren.
Read critically and record your questions as you go.
rough draft of character sketch/creative writing
As I Lay Dying reading schedule:
  • pages 2-28 due Monday, 5/2
  • pages 29-64 due Tuesday, 5/3 (we'll read as much as we can in class on Monday).
  • 65-104 due Wednesday, 5/4 (again, we'll read some in class).
  • 105-136 due Thursday, 5/5
  • 137-165 due Friday, 5/6
  • 166-217 due Monday, 5/9
  • finish the novel for Tuesday, 5/10

Final draft of Gatsby character sketch due Thursday, 5/6.
4/28
Homework check--spend five minutes describing the content of one of the podcasts you listened to for last night's homework. Consider an enlightening point, something you hadn't thought of before, a point with which you disagreed, etc.

Small group character analysis and recording of theme statements (character+action+value=theme statement).

Creative Writing--hand-written rough draft due tomorrow. Final draft due Wednesday, 5/4/11.

Bring Faulkner's As I Lay Dying to class tomorrow. Read pages 1-28 for Monday. Annotate and record questions as you critically read.
Podcast summary (homework check)
Great Gatsby
Creative Writing--hand-written rough draft due tomorrow. Final draft due Wednesday, 5/4/11.


Bring Faulkner's As I Lay Dying to class tomorrow. Read pages 1-28 for Monday. Annotate and record questions as you critically read.
4/27
JT--evaluate the ending of the novel. Based on the values of the characters, is it appropriate? Could it have ended any other way? If you had been able, what advice would you have given F. Scott Fitzgerald. Explain.

Large class discussion over events in novel. What do we learn about Gatsby in chapter 9? At what point did his pursuit of the American dream become corrupt? Examine.

Continue character analysis.

2nd Hour--consider the following and turn in:
1. Who is the most culpable for outcome? Rank in order the most responsible to the least. Why?
2. Record three theme statements based on your character's actions/values (character+action+value=theme statement).

3rd Hour--consider the above (we'll work on this tomorrow).

Homework: read Preface & Publisher's Afterward


In addition, listen to one of the following podcasts:
Slate Audio Bookclub

Studio 360

see column to the left for today's assignments
4/26
Brief Q&A

Reading quiz over Gatsby, chapters 6-8.

Character Analysis

Chapter 9 due tomorrow. Also, read the Preface once you've finished (attached below).

GG reading quiz

4/20
JT--what is missing from chapter V? Supply the missing dialogue between Gatsby and Daisy. What would they say to each other after nearly five years of separation? What would make Gatsby alter from tense and anxious to glowing from one moment to the next?

Q&A over chapter five

Small groups--complete character analysis considering personality, clothing, actions, gestures, things discussed, what others say about the character, etc.

Homework--carefully read chapters 6-8 for Tuesday. So much happens in the novel (chapter 7 is considered to be the climax). Examine the choices made by the characters, the course of events, and whether or not mistakes can be reversed.

Reading schedule for The Great Gatsby:
  • chapters 6-8 due Tuesday, 4/26
  • chapter 9 due Wednesday, 4/27 (finish the novel by this date).
4/19
Q&A over chapter 4.

Present setting analysis--add details from chapter four.

3rd Hour--begin character analysis as small groups, looking at physical attributes, gestures/actions, personality traits, etc. I'll check annotations on Tuesday.
  • Nick Carraway
  • Jay Gatsby
  • Tom Buchanan
  • Daisy
  • Jordan Baker
  • Myrtle Wilson
  • George Wilson

Reading schedule for The Great Gatsby:
  • chapter 5 due Wednesday, 4/20
  • chapters 6-8 due Tuesday, 4/26
Remember to track your selected character by annotating and making inferences regarding personality, clothing, actions, gestures, things discussed, what others say about the character, etc.
2nd Hour--R.Q. over chapter 4
Reading schedule for The Great Gatsby:
  • chapter 5 due Wednesday, 4/20
  • chapters 6-8 due Tuesday, 4/26
  • chapter 9 due Wednesday, 4/27 (finish the novel by this date).
4/18
JT--Describe the various parties we've seen throughout the first three chapters:
  1. Buchanan's dinner party
  2. Myrtle and Tom's party in Manhattan
  3. Gatsby's huge blow-out at his mansion in West Egg
Consider the people present, the activities, Nick's observations, and your inferences.

Setting Activity--East Egg, West Egg, and the Valley of the Ashes. Turn in at the end of the hour.

Great Gatsby--chapters 4 due Tuesday; character selection and visible annotations due Tuesday.

Read actively, making inferences about the characters as we meet them. Think of one character you'd like to track and make observation about physical attributes, gestures/actions, personality traits, etc. I'll check annotations on Tuesday.
  • Nick Carraway
  • Jay Gatsby
  • Tom Buchanan
  • Daisy
  • Jordan Baker
  • Myrtle Wilson
  • George Wilson
American Poetry Portfolio
Reading schedule for The Great Gatsby:
  • chapter 4 due Tuesday, 4/19
  • chapter 5 due Wednesday, 4/20
  • chapters 6-8 due Tuesday, 4/26
  • chapter 9 due Wednesday, 4/27 (finish the novel by this date).
4/15
Vocabulary Unit 11 Quiz

Great Gatsby--additional material from "authorized text," including the map:



The Great Gatsby--finish chapter 1 scene dramatizations in class.

American Poetry Portfolio will be due Monday, 4/18 at the beginning of the hour.


Great Gatsby--chapters 2 &3 due Monday; character selection and evidence of annotations due Tuesday.

Read actively, making inferences about the characters as we meet them. Think of one character you'd like to track and make observation about physical attributes, gestures/actions, personality traits, etc. I'll check annotations on Tuesday.
  • Nick Carraway
  • Jay Gatsby
  • Tom Buchanan
  • Daisy
  • Jordan Baker
  • Myrtle Wilson
  • George Wilson
Unit 11 Vocabulary
Great Gatsby--chapters 2 &3 due Monday; character selection and visible annotations due Tuesday.

Read actively, making inferences about the characters as we meet them. Think of one character you'd like to track and make observation about physical attributes, gestures/actions, personality traits, etc. I'll check annotations on Tuesday.
  • Nick Carraway
  • Jay Gatsby
  • Tom Buchanan
  • Daisy
  • Jordan Baker
  • Myrtle Wilson
  • George Wilson

Reading schedule for The Great Gatsby:
  • chapter 4 due Tuesday, 4/19
  • chapter 5 due Wednesday, 4/20
  • chapters 6-8 due Tuesday, 4/26
  • chapter 9 due Wednesday, 4/27
4/14
JT--What are your initial impressions of the Buchanans and their friend Jordan? If Nick says that Gatsby was "the only one who turned out all right at the end; it [was] what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men," what does this suggest about this intimate circle of "friends"?

Homework:
Vocabulary Unit 11 quiz tomorrow

Great Gatsby--read chapters 2 &3 for Monday. We'll read as much as we can tomorrow in class (after we finish dramatizations). Read actively, making inferences about the characters as we meet them. Think of one character you'd like to track and make observation about physical attributes, gestures/actions, personality traits, etc.
  • Nick Carraway
  • Jay Gatsby
  • Tom Buchanan
  • Daisy
  • Jordan Baker
  • Myrtle Wilson
  • George Wilson

The Great Gatsby

Unit 11 Vocabulary Quiz--Friday

American Poetry Portfolio will be due Monday, 4/18 at the beginning of the hour.


Great Gatsby--chapters 2 &3 due Monday; character selection and visible annotations due Tuesday.

Great Gatsby--read chapters 2 &3 for Monday. We'll read as much as we can tomorrow in class (after we finish dramatizations). Read actively, making inferences about the characters as we meet them. Think of one character you'd like to track and make observation about physical attributes, gestures/actions, personality traits, etc.
  • Nick Carraway
  • Jay Gatsby
  • Tom Buchanan
  • Daisy
  • Jordan Baker
  • Myrtle Wilson
  • George Wilson
4/13
Time reserved in the library to work on American Poetry Portfolio.

For tomorrow, read Fitzgerald's chapter 1 of Great Gatsby.
Make sure to read actively, considering the following:
  • Nick's attitude toward the characters he introduces us to
  • the Buchanan mansion and the events that transpire

The Great Gatsby

Unit 11 Vocabulary Quiz--Friday

American Poetry Portfolio will be due Monday, 4/18 at the beginning of the hour.
4/12
Information about "Poem in your Pocket Day" on 4/14 (Thursday) to celebrate National Poetry Month.

JT--on separate sheet of paper:
  • evaluate the writing process of the synthesis essay
  • how did your writing improve from 1st draft to final?
  • what, if anything, would you like to improve?

Vocabulary Unit 11--quiz on Friday.

Begin Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby--examine narrative voice & identify style of writing. Finish chapter 1 for Thursday.

Discuss due date for American Poetry Portfolio-- due date moved to Monday. We'll meet in the library tomorrow.


The Great Gatsby

Unit 11 Vocabulary Quiz--Friday

American Poetry Portfolio will be due Monday, 4/18 at the beginning of the hour.
4/11
No JT

Poem by Mary Ruefle "The Hand"

Synthesis essay--peer revising (handout). Please use this form to self-revise/edit your own essay.

Homework: Please type your final draft tonight
  • MLA
  • proper heading
  • double space, TNR

Tomorrow, turn in the following:
  • final draft
  • annotated sources
  • rough draft with revisions and peer editing

For class tomorrow, bring your Great Gatsby novel and Vocabulary unit 11.

American Poetry Portfolio will be due Monday, 4/18 at the beginning of the hour.
4/8
April is National Poetry Month.

Explore the genre of poetry in a non-threatening way.

Poems in anthology, favorite poems, poems of spring, poetry of Billy Collins.

American Poetry Unit information--portfolio due Thursday. See me for details (I'm unable to upload document). Let me know via email which poet you've selected (some have been taken so let me know ASAP).


Vocabulary unit 11 due Tuesday.

Also, bring highlighters to class Monday for an activity.

American Poetry Unit--information provided today in class.

Next novel--F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby
4/7
Huck Finn synthesis essay

Anthology homework for Friday. Read poetry section for Friday (183-196).

Vocabulary Unit 11 exercises due Monday.

Anthology homework for Friday. Read poetry section for Friday (183-196).

Vocabulary Unit 11 exercises due Monday.
4/6
Tips for writing the synthesis essay.

Sample prompt and essay--review, discuss, crtitique

Time in class to read documents for tomorrow's Huck Finn synthesis essay.

In-class essay on Thursday.
Anthology homework for Friday. Read poetry section for Friday (183-196).

Vocabulary Unit 11 exercises due Monday.
4/5
Huck Finn SS discussion
2nd response to literary criticism over ending or censorship controversy

4/4
JT--recount the specific incidents at the end of the novel. Evaluate the ending.

Last chapter questions.

Huck Finn SS Discussion will take place today and Tuesday. In-class essay on Wednesday.

Homework
For Tuesday, go to our library's database or your local library's database (Proquest, Galegroup, etc.) and find an article of literary criticism over The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Focus on the continuing controversy of Huck taught in the classroom or explore the significance of his journey (especially the ending). Like the other article, print and write a reflection. Cite the article correctly and write a 1 to 2 page reflection. Due Tuesday.

To access Sion's library database from home, do the following:
Blooms
  • username "purple"
  • password "storm"

Proquest
  • username is your library card #
  • password is your pin #
Huck Finn SS ?
Huck Finn SS Discussion will take place today and Tuesday. In-class essay on Thursday.

Anthology homework for Friday. Read poetry section for Friday (183-196).

Vocabulary Unit 11 exercises due Monday.
4/1
Happy Fine Arts Day (this is also National Poetry Month, and we'll be celebrating poetry again next week).

Choice during class:
  • finish reading the novel
  • work on SS discussion ?
  • find literary criticism (due Tuesday)

To access Sion's library database, do the following:
Blooms
  • username "purple"
  • password "storm"

Proquest
  • username is your library card #
  • password is your pin #

Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).


Because of this crazy, hectic week, I've pushed the Huck Finn reading back to Monday, 4/4. However, you will receive a SS discussion ? over the novel which will also be due Monday.


For Tuesday, go to our library's database or your local library's database (Proquest, Galegroup, etc.) and find an article of literary criticism over The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Focus on the continuing controversy of Huck taught in the classroom or explore the significance of his journey (especially the ending). Like the other article, print and write a reflection. Cite the article correctly and write a 1 to 2 page reflection. Due Tuesday.
3/31
JT--fill in the provided map of Huck and Jim's journey down the Mississippi. Next to or on the back of your map, record examples of the various types of satire Twain examines throughout the journey. Consider the following:
  • gullible nature of people
  • feuding
  • religious hypocrisy
  • sentimental romanticism
  • pseudo-intellectualism
  • uncultured tastes
  • fascination for ceremony
  • people's unbridled curiosity
  • greed

Examine chapter 31 in depth--Huck's moral awakening. Explore why he's conflicted and the rationale he uses to make his decision.

Select a Huck Finn SS discussion ?--due Monday.

Finish reading the novel by Monday. Socratic Seminar discussion question will also be due at this time.

Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).


Because of this crazy, hectic week, I've pushed the Huck Finn reading back to Monday, 4/4. However, you will receive a SS discussion ? over the novel which will also be due Monday.


For Tuesday, go to our library's database or your local library's database (Proquest, Galegroup, etc.) and find an article of literary criticism over The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Focus on the continuing controversy of Huck taught in the classroom or explore the significance of his journey (especially the ending). Like the other article, print and write a reflection. Cite the article correctly and write a 1 to 2 page reflection. Due Tuesday.
3/30
Continue discussion of chapter analysis, chapters 21-30.

Because of this crazy, hectic week, I've pushed the Huck Finn reading back to Monday, 4/4. However, you will receive a SS discussion ? over the novel which will also be due Monday.

Finish reading the novel by Monday. Socratic Seminar discussion question will also be due at this time (you'll receive Thursday).
3/29
Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Group discussion over assigned chapter (19-31)
  • Brief overview, a summary (3-5 sentences)
  • Main characters involved and their distinguishing character traits with specific supporting textual evidence
  • Examples of the Ironic Mask &/or cruelty of man's inhumanity to man
  • Examples of Twain's deadpan humor
  • Answer assigned Huck Finn questions. If you have less than four questions, write two of your own.
Group ? analysis
Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Because of this crazy, hectic week, I've pushed the Huck Finn reading back to Monday, 4/4. However, you will receive a SS discussion ? over the novel which will also be due Monday.
3/28
Q & A

RQ over 19-31

Group discussion over assigned chapter (19-31)
  • Brief overview, a summary (3-5 sentences)
  • Main characters involved and their distinguishing character traits with specific supporting textual evidence
  • Examples of the Ironic Mask &/or cruelty of man's inhumanity to man
  • Examples of Twain's deadpan humor
  • Answer assigned Huck Finn questions. If you have less than four questions, write two of your own.
RQ
Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Reading Schedule for the rest of the novel:
  • finish the novel by Thursday, 3/31 (pages 232-307).

Note: for those voracious readers, email me recent titles of novels you'd recommend for English II H summer reading. Criteria:
  • American author
  • literary merit, literature with layers not just "fluff" reading
3/25
Brief discussion over documentary "Race to Nowhere," a phenomenal documentary exposing the extraordinary pressure our society places on its youngest members to perform and achieve perfection.
See their website for more details:
Race To Nowhere

Vocabulary Unit 10 quiz.

Finish group analysis- chapter 17; we'll finish 18 on Monday.

Continue reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).
  • chapters 19-31 by Monday, 3/28 (pages 129-231)

Note: for those voracious readers, email me recent titles of novels you'd recommend for English II H summer reading. Criteria:
  • American author
  • literary merit, literature with layers not just "fluff" reading
Unit 10 quiz
Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Reading Schedule for the rest of the novel:
  • chapters 19-31 by Monday, 3/28 (pages 129-231).
  • finish the novel by Thursday, 3/31 (pages 232-307).
3/24
Present small group analysis over chapters 12-18.
  • Brief overview, a summary (3-5 sentences)
  • Main characters involved and their distinguishing character traits with specific supporting textual evidence
  • Examples of the Ironic Mask &/or cruelty of man's inhumanity to man
  • Examples of Twain's deadpan humor
  • Two higher-level thinking questions

Homework: keep reading actively, chapters 19-31 due Monday.

Vocabulary Unit 10 quiz Friday.

Vocabulary Unit 10 quiz Friday.

Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Reading Schedule for the rest of the novel:
  • chapters 19-31 by Monday, 3/28 (pages 129-231).
  • finish the novel by Thursday, 3/31 (pages 232-307).
3/23
JT--in your own words, explain the concept of the Ironic Mask/Socratic Irony that we discussed yesterday. In your explanation, provide an example from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (chapters 1-11, please).

Vocabulary Unit 10

Small Group Activity--chapter analysis over your assigned chapter from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Please present and turn in at the end of the hour.
  • Brief overview, a summary (3-5 sentences)
  • Main characters involved and their distinguishing character traits with specific supporting textual evidence
  • Examples of the Ironic Mask &/or cruelty of man's inhumanity to man
  • Examples of Twain's deadpan humor
  • Two higher-level thinking questions

Homework: keep reading actively, chapters 19-31 due Monday.
Group analysis over assigned chapter--see me if absent.
Vocabulary Unit 10 quiz Friday.

Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Reading Schedule for the rest of the novel:
  • chapters 19-31 by Monday, 3/28 (pages 129-231).
  • finish the novel by Thursday, 3/31 (pages 232-307).
3/22
Reading Quiz over part 2 (12-18).

Socratic Irony--explanation and examples

Homework--continue reading chapters 19-31 by Monday, 3/28 (pages 129-231).

Finish activities in Vocabulary Unit 10 by Wednesday. Quiz Friday.
Adventures of Huck Finn RQ
Vocabulary Unit 10 quiz Friday.

Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Reading Schedule for the rest of the novel:
  • chapters 19-31 by Monday, 3/28 (pages 129-231).
  • finish the novel by Thursday, 3/31 (pages 232-307).
3/21
Welcome back!

JT--freewrite over a profound or moving experience this spring break or discuss an observation you have over The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Finish PBS "Born to Trouble: Adventures of Huck Finn"

Homework for Tuesday, 3/22/11
Actively read chapters 12-18 by this day.

Finish activities in Vocabulary Unit 10 by Wednesday. Quiz Friday.

Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Reading Schedule for the rest of the novel:
  • chapters 19-31 by Monday, 3/28 (pages 129-231).
  • finish the novel by Thursday, 3/31 (pages 232-307).
3/10
Class discussion over 1-11.

Pass back TEWWG objective and essay exam

Continue PBS "Born to Trouble: Adventures of Huck Finn"

Homework for Tuesday, 3/22/11
Actively read chapters 12-18 by this day.

Have a safe, relaxing Spring Break!

Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Homework for Tuesday, 3/22/11
Actively read chapters 12-18 by this day.
3/9
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn questions for analysis over chapters 1-11. Please see me for handout.

Homework for Tuesday, 3/22/11
Actively read chapters 12-18 by this day.
1-11 analysis questions
Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Homework for Tuesday, 3/22/11
Actively read chapters 12-18 by this day.
3/8
2nd hour-very few students present because of Spanish/French contests, so class-time to read quietly.

3rd hour-fabulous discussion concerning the recent publication of Dr. Alan Gribben's revised edition of Huck Finn.
Newspaper/
magazine article and summary.
Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Homework for Tuesday, 3/22/11
Actively read chapters 12-18 by this day.
3/7
Culture Shock video from PBS "Born to Trouble: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

Change for the reading--due Wednesday!
Homework for Wednesday--finish reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199). Chapters 1-11 will be due Wednesday (about 10 pages/night).

Due Tuesday, 3/8/11
In addition, find a newspaper, magazine, or reputable on-line article about the current controversy surrounding Dr. Alan Gribben's newly revised Huckleberry Finn . Read and write an 1/2 to 1 full page summary. Attach article to summary and cite source correctly.

Here's a link to the introduction by Alan Gribben:
Introduction to the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Music students--turn in Jacobs/Douglass
chapter analysis today or tomorrow, please.
Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199).

Homework for Tuesday, 3/22/11
Actively read chapters 12-18 by this day.
3/4
First few pages of A Million Nightingales. Compare the fictional, 1st person account to nonfiction slave narrative of Jacobs and Douglass.

Finish Jacobs.

Homework for Tuesday, 3/8/2011--begin reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199). Chapters 1-11 will be due Tuesday (about 10 pages/night).

In addition, find a newspaper, magazine, or reputable on-line article about the current controversy surrounding Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and the newly published version. Read and write an 1/2 to 1 full page summary. Attach article to summary and cite source correctly.

Homework for Tuesday, 3/8/2011--begin reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199). Chapters 1-11 will be due Tuesday (about 10 pages/night).

In addition, find a newspaper, magazine, or reputable on-line article about the current controversy surrounding Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and the newly published version. Read and write an 1/2 to 1 full page summary. Attach article to summary and cite source correctly.
3/3
JT--Last semester we witnessed the excruciating ordeal Jacobs endured while living in an attic crawl space for seven years. Yet Jacobs was never defeated by her circumstances. She had letters mailed from the North, sending Dr. Flint on futile, expensive man-hunts. She, along with her family acting as accomplices, thwarted an Institution so vile in its construction. Why do you think its important to continue reading the slave narratives from men and women like Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs? Explain.

Read "New Perils"

Small group analysis over the following chapters:Harriet Jacobs--for Thursday's class
  • "The Flight"
  • "The Children Sold"
  • "The Loophole of Retreat"
  • "Free at Last"

Homework for Tuesday, 3/8/2011--begin reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199). Chapters 1-11 will be due Tuesday (about 10 pages/night).
Jacob chapter analysis
Homework for Tuesday, 3/8/2011--begin reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199). Chapters 1-11 will be due Tuesday (about 10 pages/night).

In addition, find a newspaper, magazine, or reputable on-line article about the current controversy surrounding Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and the newly published version. Read and write an 1/2 to 1 full page summary. Attach article to summary and cite source correctly.
3/2
Vocabulary Unit 9 quiz

Finish looking at F. Douglass "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July"

Harriet Jacobs
  • "A Perilous Passage in the Slave Girl's Life"
  • "Another Link to Life"
  • "Scenes at the Plantation"


Harriet Jacobs--for Thursday's class
  • "The Flight"
  • "The Children Sold"
  • "The Loophole of Retreat"
  • "Free at Last"
Vocabulary and R.Q.
Homework for Tuesday, 3/8/2011--begin reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Penguin Edition, ISBN #9780142437199). Chapters 1-11 will be due Tuesday (about 10 pages/night).
3/1
JT--re-read the Introduction by the Editor on page 127-128. How is life for a female slave vastly different than that of a man like Frederick Douglass?

Divide last night's chapters among class to create small groups and complete the following:
  1. Summary of main events
  2. Identify the audience
  3. What is the purpose? Has the "veil" been cast aside to shed light on the interior life of a slave woman? Explain.
  4. Compare Jacob's life to F. Douglass. Are there similarities/differences?
  5. Based on the aforementioned analysis, what fundamental truths does Jacobs make about slavery/humanity?

Homework tonight, please read the following:
Harriet Jacobs
  • "A Perilous Passage in the Slave Girl's Life"
  • "Another Link to Life"
  • "Scenes at the Plantation"

Vocabulary Unit 9 Quiz tomorrow
Group analysis over assigned chapters.
Harriet Jacobs--for Thursday's class
  • "The Flight"
  • "The Children Sold"
  • "The Loophole of Retreat"
  • "Free at Last"
2/28
JT--Select one of the following topics and record your response. Use specific anecdotes/support from Douglass to address the topic:
1. Justice for slaves (and for all men of color) is different from justice for whites.
2. No one can be enslaved if she or he has the ability to read, write, and think.
3. Slaves were treated no better than, and sometimes far harsher than, livestock.
4. The Christianity of the slaveholders is hypocritical and used to justify their actions.

Chapter XI and Appendix.

Homework: Read the Preface to Harriet Jacob's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl as well as the following:
  • "Childhood"
  • "The Trials of Girlhood"
  • "The Jealous Mistress"
  • "The Lover"

K&K's Frederick Douglass Timeline

Library of Congress
Unit 9 Vocabulary paragraph.
Harriet Jacobs
  • "A Perilous Passage in the Slave Girl's Life"
  • "Another Link to Life"
  • "Scenes at the Plantation"
  • "The Flight"
  • "The Children Sold"
  • "The Loophole of Retreat"
  • "Free at Last"

Vocabulary Quiz unit 9 on Wednesday
2/25
JT--What superstition does Frederick cling to as he confronts Covey? What do you attribute his success to? What are some superstitions in our culture? In other literature we've read this year? Why might some of the slaves turn to superstition?

Go over unit 9 vocabulary, quiz on Tuesday.
Unit 9 vocabulary assignment--using 8 words from unit 9, write about a current event.

Highlights of chapter 10--Mr. Covey, Sabbath school, treatment of Hugh Auld vs. that of Thomas Auld when Frederick encounters turmoil/conflict, etc.

Homework: Finish reading chapter 11 and Appendix for Monday. Also read the attached document by Douglass:


Library of Congress Frederick Douglass

see the column to the left
2/24
Distribute new books for those who received incorrect edition.

Finish presentations over chapters 7, 8, 9

Chapter 10--active & silent reading the rest of the hour.

Homework:
Finish reading Douglass chapter 10 for tomorrow.
Unit 9 vocabulary due tomorrow.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
  • chapter 11 and Appendix for Monday
2/23
JT--Describe F. Douglass's thirst for knowledge, both reading and writing. Why does he equate an education with power? Ironically, how does Mr. Hugh Auld's prophecy come true?

Today in class--small group discussion & writing over the following (your group's assigned chapter):
  • Trace the course of who owns F. Douglass up through your chapter.
  • Provide a brief overview/summary
  • Discuss any of the chapter's anecdotes in depth
  • Point out and explain an example of irony
  • If there are any allusions, literary or biblical, explain.
  • Create two higher-level thinking questions

Present and turn in.

Change--read chapter 10 for Friday. Vocabulary due Friday.
group analysis over assigned chapter
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
  • chapter 10 for Friday (67-98)
  • chapter 11 and Appendix for Monday

Complete vocabulary unit 9 for Friday.
2/22
JT--Discuss the veracity of Morrrison's statements by applying the following truths to Douglass:
1. "This is my historical life--my singular, special example that is personal, but that also represents the race."
2. "I write this text to persuade other people---you, the reader, who is probably not black--that we are human beings worthy of God's grace and the immediate abandonment of slavery."

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave--read chapters 5-9 (39-66) for tomorrow.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass


Link to Library of Congress Timeline:
Frederick Douglass Timeline from Library of Congress

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
  • chapter 10 for Friday (67-98)
  • chapter 11 and Appendix for Monday

Complete vocabulary unit 9 for Friday.
2/18
Essay over TEWWG


Please note that I'm unable to print and post a clear copy of the Modern Library edition, ISBN #780345478238. The copies are far too dark to read. Instead, click on the following link to read William Lloyd Garrison's Preface and F. Douglass chapters 1-4.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

If Back to Books sent you the wrong copy, please contact and voice your frustration. You'll need the Modern Library addition to read both Douglass and Jacobs. Check your local library for copies as we'll need them next week.

Homework:
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
Read the following sections for Tuesday:
  • F. Douglass bio (v & vi)
  • Harriet Jacobs bio (vii & viii)
  • Introduction (xi-xvi)
  • Preface (3-11)
  • F. Douglass, chapters 1-4 (17-38).
You'll need Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
for class Tuesday.
Also--read the following short essay by Toni Morrison:

TEWWG In-class essay
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
Read the following sections for Tuesday:
  • F. Douglass bio (v & vi)
  • Harriet Jacobs bio (vii & viii)
  • Introduction (xi-xvi)
  • Preface (3-11)
  • F. Douglass, chapters 1-4 (17-38).
You'll need Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
for class Tuesday.

Vocabulary--unit 9 for Friday
2/17
Objective Portion

TEWWG essay tomorrow. For 2nd hour 2/16 discussion, click on 2/15 post.
Objective portion of test.
Read the following Toni Morrison essay by Monday

Find Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Salve Girl by Harriet Jacobs and bring to class Friday.
2/16
Continue TEWWG Socratic Seminar--will post 2nd hour discussion soon (thanks today to Brittany and Maggie G for recording notes).

3rd Hour TEWWG SS
TEWWG Found Poems
Objective portion of TEWWG will take place on Thursday, subjective (essay) will take place on Friday.

Read the following Toni Morrison essay by Monday

Find Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Salve Girl by Harriet Jacobs and bring to class Friday.
2/15
Their Eyes Were Watching God Socratic Seminar
click on the link to view discussion (thanks to Maggie and Michaela).
2nd Hour SS TEWWG 2/15
3rd Hour TEWWG SS

Homework--found poem and illustration
TEWWG SS discussion question
Read the "Foreword" by Edwidge Danticat or Mary Helen Washington and the "Afterword" by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Most of you have this but have one version or another of the foreward. I have copied Washington and Danticat's if you'd like to read one or both.

Mary Helen Washington:

Edwidge Danticat:


Objective portion of TEWWG will take place on Thursday, subjective (essay) will take place on Friday.
2/14
Happy Valentine's Day

JT--although what Janie goes through is devastating, it doesn't destroy her. Evaluate the ending of the novel. Why did Hurston end the novel as she did? Explain.

Sign up for Socratic Seminar discussion question (due tomorrow). See directions at the top of page. This is an independent assignment; no collaboration over your assigned question. If you do use literary criticism, make sure it's from a valid source and cite correctly. Type, 1.5-2 pages double-spaced, due Tuesday.


Read the "Foreword" by Edwidge Danticat or Mary Helen Washington and the "Afterword" by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Most of you have this but have one version or another of the foreward. I have copied Washington and Danticat's if you'd like to read one or both.

Mary Helen Washington:

Edwidge Danticat:


For Tuesday, read "Foreword" and"Afterword" & answer your assigned SS discussion ?

Socratic Seminar will take place Tuesday &Wednesday.

Found Poem assignment--listen carefully. This will be due Wednesday, 2/16/11. See me for details.

Objective portion of TEWWG will take place on Thursday, subjective (essay) will take place on Friday.

POL Regional Contest
Support Kathryn Thompson, Sion's Poetry Out Loud winner. The contest takes place Saturday morning at the Writer's Place (3607 Pennsylvania) located near the Uptown Theater in Midtown. She'll be reciting "Another Feeling," "Solitude," & "The Gift."
Way to go, Kathryn. Good luck!


2/11
Small groups--go over analysis of your assigned section before you present. Make sure you've tied in the smaller parts with overall ideas.

Small group discussion over 16, 17, & 18.

Homework--finish the novel by Monday (chapters 19 & 20). Recall the frame narrative which began the story; how does it come to fruition? (Consider those events Janie referred to at the beginning and what came to pass). Go back and re-read the first chapter and look at the horizon/heaven motif one more time.

Socratic Seminar will take place Tuesday &Wednesday.

Found Poem assignment--listen carefully. This will be due Wednesday, 2/16/11.
What Does Your Character Want?
(character analysis)
Homework--finish the novel by Monday (chapters 19 & 20). Recall the frame narrative which began the story; how does it come to fruition (those events Janie referred to at the beginning--what came to pass?). Go back and re-read the first chapter and look at the horizon/heaven motif one more time.

For Tuesday, read "Foreword" and"Afterword" & answer your assigned SS discussion ? (I'll pass this out on Monday).

Socratic Seminar will take place Tuesday &Wednesday.

Found Poem assignment--listen carefully. This will be due Wednesday, 2/16/11.
2/10
A few minutes to review Unit 8 vocabulary--quiz today.

Small group analysis--you will have a small section to mine the text looking at the nuances of language and how the language creates effect:
  • who are the major characters involved in the action?
  • what are the plot events and how do they effect the major characters involved? Make sure you identify the conflict(s).
  • select at least two examples of figurative language or imagery and examine nuances of meaning
  • are there any biblical or historical allusions? Explain.
  • two higher level thinking questions

WDYCW--due Friday.
Unit 8 vocabulary and group analysis of assigned chapter.
Their Eyes Were Watching God reading schedule:
  • 19 & 20 (finish the novel for Monday, 2/14)

WDYCW--due Friday.

Found Poem--more details to come later
2/9
JT--Describe one of the events in chapters 13, 14, or 15 that you found to be surprising or inconsistent with a character's actions thus far in the novel.

TEWWG small group discussion and analysis--compare and contrast the muck to Eatonville. Consider Janie and Tea Cake's experiences, what they do for fun, the social mix of people, their attitudes toward Janie and Tea Cake, etc. One of the members can illustrate an important scene from the chapter.
In addition, consider two higher-level thinking questions over chapters 13, 14, and 15.
Please turn in the following:
  • comparative analysis over Eatonville and the muck
  • illustration of an important scene
  • two higher-level thinking questions over chapters 13, 14, &/or 15

Homework--read 16-18 for Thursday, vocabulary unit 8 quiz tomorrow.
Writing assignment--WDYCW? due Friday.

Vocabulary Unit 8 quiz on Thursday.

Their Eyes Were Watching God reading schedule:
  • 16-18 for Thursday, 2/10
  • 19 & 20 (finish the novel for Monday, 2/14)

WDYCW--due Friday.

Found Poem--more details to come later
2/8
JT--Compare Tea Cake's treatment of Janie to that of Logan and Jody's treatment of her.

Reading Quiz--3rd Hour

Finish class discussion over TEWWG chapter 9 and continue with 10-12.

Homework--read TEWWG 13, 14, & 15 for tomorrow (Wed).
Write a summary of any TEWWG chapters/events from the novel thus far using at least 8 of the unit 8 vocabulary (due Wednesday). I don't care how long the paragraph is. Please make sure the words make sense in context and underline vocabulary.
hour 3--RQ
Vocabulary Unit 8 quiz on Thursday.


Their Eyes Were Watching God reading schedule:
  • 13-15 for Wednesday, 2/9
  • 16-18 for Thursday, 2/10
  • 19 & 20 (finish the novel for Monday, 2/14)

Found Poem--more details to come later
2/7
Reading Quiz TEWWG--2nd Hour

Vocabulary unit 8--go over words

TEWWG discussion questions over chapters 7-9 in class.

Homework--read chapters 10, 11, & 12 for tomorrow. Write a summary of these chapters using at least 8 of the unit 8 vocabulary (due Wednesday).
hour 2--RQ
Homework--read chapters 10, 11, & 12 for tomorrow. Write a summary of these chapters using at least 8 of the unit 8 vocabulary (due Wednesday).
2/4
JT--select a character from the novel and create a sketch of that character. Consider actions, dialogue, narrator's perceptions, clothing, and other factors.

TEWWG--small class discussion

Vocabulary--complete unit 8 for Monday; unit 8 quiz next Thursday, 2/10.

For Monday, actively read and annotate TEWWG chapters 7, 8, & 9 (pages 76-93).
TEWWG ?s 5 & 6
Vocabulary--complete unit 8 for Monday; unit 8 quiz next Thursday, 2/10.

For Monday, actively read and annotate TEWWG chapters 7, 8, & 9 (pages 76-93).
2/3
What a week. Welcome Back!
Obviously, circumstances have changed with the missing school days.

JT--Find at least two passages from chapters 5 & 6 of Joe stifling Janie's voice. Summarize or paraphrase and write a response to these passages. Consider the difference between the two different types of narration--why does the narrator intervene at various points? When do we hear from Janie?Why?

Whole-class discussion. Take notes, make observations.

Tonight--complete two questions from chapter 5 and two questions from chapter 6 for tomorrow.
TEWWG ?s 2-4
Vocabulary on hold for a couple of days. Complete unit 8 for Monday; unit 8 quiz next Thursday, 2/10.

For Monday, actively read and annotate TEWWG chapters 7, 8, & 9 (pages 76-93).
1/31
JT--Take a passage from chapters 2-4, one that was confusing or beautifully written, write the partial passage and make some inferences.

TEWWG
  • read chapters 5 & 6 for Wednesday
  • for tomorrow, check the attached list of TEWWG questions, select one from each chapter (for a total of three) and prepare for Tuesday.
2nd Hour TEWWG 2-4
3rd Hour TEWWG 2-4
  • Vocabulary unit 8 due tomorrow, quiz Friday.
TEWWG 2-4 reading quiz
Continue actively reading/annotating Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God
1/28
Vocabulary unit 7 quiz.

TEWWG--specific question to answer over the first chapter of the novel.

Finish listening to chapter 1 TEWWG

Small groups to discuss and present.

TEWWG--read through chapter 4 for Monday. Annotate and read actively, write your questions down as they arise.

Vocabulary unit 8 due Tuesday.
vocabulary
TEWWG--read through chapter 4 for Monday. Annotate and read actively, write your questions down as they arise.

Vocabulary unit 8 due Tuesday.
1/27
JT--what is the purpose of figurative language? What can figurative language convey that ordinary language can't? In pairs select one of the examples of figurative language found in the first chapter. Paraphrase using literal language. Discuss the effect of Hurston's use of very poetic prose.

Listen to the first chapter out loud.

Vocabulary unit 7 quiz tomorrow.

Vocabulary unit 7 quiz on Friday.

TEWWG--read through chapter 4 for Monday, 1/3111
1/26
JT--based on your understanding of "How if Feels to be a Colored Me" describe Zora Neale Hurston's personality/voice. Compare the voice of the essay to the language in her short story "Sweat." Explain your inferences with examples.

Analysis questions over "Sweat"

For tomorrow read the first chapter of Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. Annotate and record your questions. Determin how Hurston created Janie's character. Make sure you bring her novel to class tomorrow.

Vocabulary unit 7 quiz on Friday.

TEWWG--read through chapter 4 for Monday, 1/3111
1/25
In-class essay over The Glass Menagerie

Homework--anthology reading over Zora Neale Hurston (197-204)
  • "Sweat"
  • "How it Feels to be a Colored Me"

Check vocabulary unit 7 tomorrow, quiz Friday.
in-class essay
Vocabulary unit 7 quiz Friday.

Their Eyes Were Watching God--bring to class Friday.
1/24
Pablo Picasso's "Guernica"

Glass Menagerie Socratic Seminar--prepare for tomorrow's in-class essay. Review the play, your questions, the other discussion questions, and character traits from character debate.
2nd SS Glass Menagerie
discussion question.
In preparation for Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, read "Sweat" and "How it Feels to be a Colored Me" in the anthology for Wednesday (pages 197-204).
1/21
Poetry Out Loud--those who are participating on Tuesday after school, please write the names of your poems on the sign-up sheet.

Collect AP English Application Packets.

Finish Glass Menagerie character debate.

Begin Socratic Seminar discussion which will continue through Monday. In-class essay over the play will take place on Tuesday.

Homework--read The Glass Menagerie Introduction by Robert Bray, read "The Catastrophe of Success" by T. Williams at the end of the play, and select another SS discussion question to answer for Monday.
AP English Application Packets & Glass Menagerie SS ?
Glass Menagerie in-class essay on Tuesday.
Pablo Picasso's "Guernica" on Monday.


Check Vocabulary unit 7 Wednesday, 1/26/11. Vocabulary unit 7 quiz on Friday.

Next novel--Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.
1/19
Glass Menagerie debate--which character is the protagonist?

Glass Menagerie SS ?--due Friday. Kathryn-please select one from the attachment below.


AP English Application Packet--due Thursday. You may print or pick up a copy from me in class.

If we have a snow day Thursday, please email me your personal statements (mwilcox@ndsion.edu)

Vocabulary unit 7 due Friday.

If you don't recite your poem during class, please make an appointment to do so before, during, or after school.
1/18
POL class competition

The Glass Menagerie--20 minutes to collect and organize your evidence to debate that your characters is the most important in the play. Some of the debate will begin today, the rest will take place Wednesday.

Homework--prepare lesson #7 for Thursday. Bring vocabulary to class tomorrow.


AP English Application Packet--due Thursday. You may print or pick up a copy from me in class.


The Glass Menagerie--this week.

AP English Applications due by Thursday.

If you're considering the POL school-wide competition next Tuesday, please email me your 2nd poem by Thursday. Remember,
  • memorize two poems from the POL website or anthology
  • "select poems of various style, time period and voice" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • "diversity in the selections will offer a richer and more complete performance" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • one poem must be 25 lines or shorter
  • one poem must have been written before the 20th century

If you don't recite your poem during class, please make an appointment to do so before, during, or after school.
1/12
What a week! I hope you enjoyed your snow days.

Ms. Westenfeld to discuss PLAN and PSAT

A Streetcar will be shown during lunch study hall the rest of this week.

Tomorrow--be prepared for a check-for-reading quiz over Glass Menagerie.

Homework--continue memorizing your POL poem. The school-wide contest may be moved back a few days because of the snow. However, our classroom recitation will begin on Tuesday, 1/18.
Also, select a character from Glass Menagerie. Gather passages from the play depicting unique nuances & complex personality traits. Consider mannerisms, dialogue with other characters, actions, even the aspects of props in the play. Make sure you collect at least 10 different passages from various scenes throughout the play. Write down the partial passage, the scene, and the page number and bring to class tomorrow.
POL poems and their TO PASS IT assignments.
Memorize your poem by Tuesday, January 18th.

Criteria for Poetry Recitation Contest
For the classroom competition, you only have to memorize one poem from the POL website or anthology (on my desk).

If you are seriously going to compete in the school-wide competition you need to consider the following:
  • memorize two poems from the POL website or anthology
  • "select poems of various style, time period and voice" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • "diversity in the selections will offer a richer and more complete performance" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • one poem must be 25 lines or shorter
  • one poem must have been written before the 20th century

If you advance to state and national levels, you will need to memorize three poems.


Check-for-reading quiz Thursday over T. Williams The Glass Menagerie.
1/6
&
1/7
Watch A Streetcar Named Desire in preparation for his other famous play The Glass Menagerie. Have The Glass Menagerie read by Tuesday.

TO PASS IT--sample over part of "Song of Myself"

T=Title
O=Occasion
P=Purpose
A=Audience
S=Speaker
S=Situation
I=Imagery
T=Tone

Homework--complete "TO PASS IT" analysis over the other two poems--due Monday, 1/10/11.

Finalize your poetry selection. Begin memorizing and practicing your recitation. See poetry tips for suggestions.

Memorize your poem by Tuesday, January 18th.

Criteria for Poetry Recitation Contest
For the classroom competition, you only have to memorize one poem from the POL website or anthology (on my desk).

If you are seriously going to compete in the school-wide competition you need to consider the following:
  • memorize two poems from the POL website or anthology
  • "select poems of various style, time period and voice" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • "diversity in the selections will offer a richer and more complete performance" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • one poem must be 25 lines or shorter
  • one poem must have been written before the 20th century

If you advance to state and national levels, you will need to memorize three poems.


Please read T. Williams The Glass Menagerie by next Tuesday, 1/11/11.
1/5/11
Preview a few Poetry Out Loud video clips.

Criteria for evaluation

TO PASS IT--sample over part of "Song of Myself"

T=title
O=Occasion
P=Purpose
A=Audience
S=Speaker
S=Situation
I=Imagery
T=Tone

Homework--complete "TO PASS IT" analysis over the other two poems--due Monday, 1/10/11.

Finalize your poetry selection. Begin memorizing and practicing your recitation. See poetry tips for suggestions.

Memorize your poem by Tuesday, January 18th.

Criteria for Poetry Recitation Contest
For the classroom competition, you only have to memorize one poem from the POL website or anthology (on my desk).

If you are seriously going to compete in the school-wide competition you need to consider the following:
  • memorize two poems from the POL website or anthology
  • "select poems of various style, time period and voice" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • "diversity in the selections will offer a richer and more complete performance" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • one poem must be 25 lines or shorter
  • one poem must have been written before the 20th century

If you advance to state and national levels, you will need to memorize three poems.


Please read T. Williams The Glass Menagerie by next Tuesday, 1/11/11.
1/4/11
Read your favorite (or part of it) childhood poem aloud to your peer. Put yourself back into your childhood shoes and recall what it was like to hear it read to you. Specifically, what did you enjoy most?

NPR story--listen to "Litany" by Billy Collins

Poetry Out Loud--see "What's Ahead" column

Begin reading Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" in class--finish for homework (142-149). Annotate as you read his free verse poem.

Also, select three favorite poems for the POL website
recopy or print the poems with the following information:
  • title
  • author
  • any additional information (epigraph & stanza numbers, if included)
Bring three poems to class tomorrow.

Memorize your poem by Tuesday, January 18th.

Criteria for Poetry Recitation Contest
For the classroom competition, you only have to memorize one poem from the POL website or anthology (on my desk).

If you are seriously going to compete in the school-wide competition you need to consider the following:
  • memorize two poems from the POL website or anthology
  • "select poems of various style, time period and voice" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • "diversity in the selections will offer a richer and more complete performance" (POL Teacher's Guide, p. 6)
  • one poem must be 25 lines or shorter
  • one poem must have been written before the 20th century

If you advance to state and national levels, you will need to memorize three poems.


Please read T. Williams The Glass Menagerie by next Tuesday, 1/11/11.
1/3/11
Welcome back!

JT--define your goals for the rest of this academic school year or free write about your winter break.

Poetry Out Loud clip--go to Poetry Out Loud website to select three poems for Wednesday's class
Poetry Out Loud

As part of our 3rd quarter poetry unit, I'm going to ask each of you to memorize a poem for the Poetry Out Loud competition. More details to come soon.

New seating chart

Final Exam

Tonight--read background on Longfellow and Whitman in anthology (138-141). Also, find two or three of your favorite childhood poems. Re

Please read T. Williams The Glass Menagerie by next Tuesday, 1/11/11.
12/7
Finish Grapes of Wrath characterization.

Naturalism defined as "a late 19th-c movement in literature and art that grew out of the theory of realism. The basic effort of naturalism lay in the attempt to produce scientifically accurate depiction of life even at the cost of representing ugliness and discord. The motives and behavior of characters are determined by hereditary and environment" (Dictionary of Literary Terms).
Usually the struggle of the characters against the natural world was a losing one.

No new homework other than to review for finals.

Suggestion--now that you've finished the novel, read the introduction by Robert DeMott.

Also, if you have any remaining oops passes, please turn in for extra credit Wednesday or Thursday at the latest.
SS discussion ?
Final Exam on Friday.

No new reading over the break.

Poetry Out Loud will begin upon our return from break, so if you'd like to start memorizing a poem (will be an assignment for 3rd quarter), check out the Poetry Out Loud website for selections:
Poetry Out Loud
12/6
end of the novel reading quiz

G of W--SS ? due tomorrow at the beginning of the hour.
G of W reading quiz
Final Exam on Friday
12/2
JT--as the Joads migrate westward, contrast their hopes and dreams (look at that first view of California) in chapter 18 to the dawning reality. What have they heard from others who have been and are migrating back eastward? What compels them to continue? Look specifically at chapter 15.

Finish presenting setting analysis.

Small groups to continue character observations. Examine how the characters are static or dynamic. If you are analyzing one of the female characters, do so in relation to her male counterparts. Are the Joad men stronger or weaker than their the female members? Explain.
If you have a character who has died or disappeared, look at one of the other characters we've met along the way including:
  • Mae (15)
  • Mrs. Wilson
  • Lisbeth Sandry (@ Weedpatch)

Homework
Continue reading the novel. Finish for Monday.
Finish checking interview.
Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6.


English II H
Semester Final Review Guide--more information to follow.

12/1
No journal topic today.

Present detailed analysis of setting.
Take copious notes and conduct a class discussion with group's higher level thinking questions. Look at themes within the in-between chapters. What problems does Steinbeck highlight in these chapters? Are the Joads affected by similar plights?
Assigned setting activity.
Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6.


English II H
Semester Final Review Guide--more information to follow.

11/30
JT--comparison between Grapes of Wrath and The Glass Castle. Read the first chapter of The Glass Castle and G of W chapter 19 (pages 233-234). Both passages refer to the homeless and to the observers of the homeless. Compare the authors' attitudes toward their subjects. Consider the authors' use of detail, point of view, diction.

Continue setting analysis and in addition to completing, create two higher level thinking questions about your section. Present your findings to the class.


Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6. If you begin reading tonight, that's 15-16 pages/night.
Day of listening interviews.

3rd hour--since class was cut short, I'll continue checking tomorrow.
Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6. If you begin reading tonight, that's 15-16 pages/night.


English II H
Semester Final Review Guide--more information to follow.

11/29
English II H
Semester Final Review Guide--more information to follow.


JT--Contrast two California migrant camps: the Hooverville to the Government run Weedpatch camp. What events occur, whom do the Joads meet, how do the Joads feel at each location? Explain.

Record your questions over the novel thus far.

Setting Activity--listen to details.
Check Day of listening interviews (today or tomorrow)
Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6. If you begin reading tonight, that's 15-16 pages/night.
11/23
JT--the Joads archetypal journey, the great migration begins and ends through chapter 18. Record the changes your character goes through on this journey. How is he/she beginning to transform?

Finish Joad character analysis.

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 19-25 due by Monday,11/29


Interview Questions for Day of Listening

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 19-25 due by Monday,11/29

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6


Oral History--if you are visiting an elderly relative over Thanksgiving, conduct an oral history (interview). Ask questions about what it was like to grow up during the Great Depression.
Click on the following PDF for helpful suggestions:


11/22
"C"
JT--record at least two questions/observations you have over the novel thus far.

Character Activity--listen to directions

Homework--read Grapes of Wrath 12-18 for Tuesday, 11/23.

In preparation for your day of listening (interview with a family member of family friend) please post an interview question on the google doc. Put your name in parenthesis next to your question.
Interview Questions for Day of Listening

If your Grapes of Wrath novel is missing chapters, please click on the PDF. If you'd like hard copies of the chapters, please let me know. Remember, you can rotate the view to make your reading more comfortable.





Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 19-25 due by Monday,11/29

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6


Oral History--if you are visiting an elderly relative over Thanksgiving, conduct an oral history (interview). Ask questions about what it was like to grow up during the Great Depression.
Click on the following PDF for helpful suggestions:


11/19
Reading quiz over the first 11 chapters of Grapes of Wrath.

Dust Bowl--check out the following link and watch additional stories from PBS & the American Experience
Surviving the Dust Bowl

Q&A--examine tone and setting in the first part of the novel and meet the Joads.


Homework--
Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 12-18 due by Tuesday, 11/23
Section 1 reading quiz over G of W
Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 12-18 due by Tuesday, 11/23

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 19-25 due by Monday,11/29

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6


Oral History--if you are visiting an elderly relative over Thanksgiving, conduct an oral history (interview). Ask questions about what it was like to grow up during the Great Depression.
Click on the following PDF for helpful suggestions:

11/18
No JT

Present Walden

Reading quiz tomorrow over G of W
Walden/Civil Disobdience
Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 12-18 due by Tuesday, 11/23

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 19-25 due by Monday,11/29

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6


Oral History--if you are visiting an elderly relative over Thanksgiving, conduct an oral history (interview). Ask questions about what it was like to grow up during the Great Depression.
Click on the following PDF for helpful suggestions:

11/17
JT--If you were going to a remote part of the world with limited access to civilization, what are three vital items you would take with you? Why?

NPR segment of Thoreau
Thoreau links Walden Pond

Walden and Civil Disobedience
  • summarize your assigned passage
  • select an important aphorism & explain meaning as it relates to living today
  • look at a particularly dense passage--look up diction, connotation of words, and discuss meaning
  • figures of speech, imagery. Not only should you identify, but also relate to meaning of the this passage

Homework for tomorrow--reading quiz over chapters 1-11 (Grapes of Wrath) will take place on Friday.

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 12-18 due by Tuesday, 11/23

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 19-25 due by Monday,11/29

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6


Oral History--if you are visiting an elderly relative over Thanksgiving, conduct an oral history (interview). Ask questions about what it was like to grow up during the Great Depression.
Click on the following PDF for helpful suggestions:

11/15
"B"
JT--Listen to REM's "Walk Unafraid and make connections to Emerson's "Self-Reliance"

Today--finish Transcendentalism notes and discuss "Self-Reliance"

No homework for tomorrow (other than to get a good night's sleep in preparation for tomorrow's PLAN test. Also, eat a protein-packed breakfast).

For Wednesday--actively read and annotate the following:
  • Thoreau biography, 101
  • Walden, 122-128
  • Civil Disobedience, 129-134
Nature walk observations
Next novel--Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 1-11 due by Friday, 11/19 (this is 17 pages/night).

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 12-18 due by Tuesday, 11/23

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 19-25 due by Monday,11/29

Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 26-end of the novel due by Monday, 12/6
11/12
JT--Synthesized response defending the claim that nature plays an integral role in our life. This time, add Emerson's aphorisms on Nature to yesterday's response.

Continue yesterday's debate over "Death of an Innocent"

Transcendentalism notes--see link


Homework for Monday
Assign Emerson's "Self-Reliance" to individual students. 3rd hour and absent 2nd hour students, see assigned paragraphs.

After reading the entire excerpt from your anthology (97-100), take your assigned paragraph and analyze for the following:
  • summary/paraphrase
  • diction--connotation/denotation of words
  • imagery
  • figurative language
  • message he conveys

Writing:
This weekend, make a conscientious attempt to put away the technology (cell phone, ipod, ipad, laptop, or other electronic devices). Take a walk and observe your surroundings. Make sure to observe sights, sounds, smells, and other sensory details. Write a one-two page reflection about your experiences. Due Monday at the beginning of the hour.
If you didn't turn in "Death of an Innocent" yesterday, please due so today.
Writing:
This weekend, make a conscientious attempt to put away the technology (cell phone, ipod, ipad, laptop, or other electronic devices). Take a walk and observe your surroundings. Make sure to observe sights, sounds, smells, and other sensory details. Write a one-two page reflection about your experiences. Due Monday at the beginning of the hour.

Next novel--Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 1-11 due by Friday, 11/19 (this is 17 pages/night).
11/11
JT--Spend at least 10 minutes writing a synthesized response defending the claim that nature plays an integral role in our lives Please use at least three of the sources from last night's reading:
  • Chief Seattle's speech
  • "A Sand County Almanac"
  • "The Consent"
  • "Seeing"
  • "The Secret Life"
  • "Staying Alive"

Homework for tomorrow--read Emerson's excerpt from Nature for tomorrow. Please read actively by annotating and looking up unfamiliar diction (93-96).
Check "Death of an Innocent" list and discuss his choices.
Writing:
This weekend, make a conscientious attempt to put away the technology (cell phone, ipod, ipad, laptop, or other electronic devices). Take a walk and observe your surroundings. Make sure to observe sights, sounds, smells, and other sensory details. Write a one-two page reflection about your experiences. Due Monday at the beginning of the hour.

Next novel--Grapes of Wrath
Chapters 1-11 due by Friday, 11/19 (this is 17 pages/night).
11/10
Ms. Westefeld in class to discuss PLAN test.

Homework--actively read pages 69-77 in the anthology for tomorrow--Chief Seattle's speech to David Wagoner.

Also, bring "Death of an Innocent" list and evaluation to class on Thursday.
On Thursday, turn in your "Death of an Innocent" list and evaluation.
This weekend, make a conscientious attempt to put away the technology (cell phone, ipod, ipad, laptop, or other electronic devices). Take a walk and observe your surroundings. Make sure to observe sights, sounds, smells, and other sensory details. Write a one-two page reflection about your experiences. Due Monday at the beginning of the hour.
11/9
Field Trip to see Harriet Jacobs


11/8
"A"
Gothic Tale--turn in final draft after you answer the following:
1. What did you fine-tune the most and what are you most proud of after revising the many drafts?
2. What are your most prominent symbols and what did you want them to convey? How do they impact the story's meaning?
3. What is one aspect of your writing you'd like to develop further (syntax, diction, imagery, ideas)?

Reminder--for tomorrow's field trip, please bring a sack lunch.

Homework for Tuesday--please read the following excerpt before we see the Harriet Jacobs play tomorrow.


Homework for Wednesday--review "Death of an Innocent" and make a list of the anti-establishment (unconventional choices) Alex/Christopher McCandless made throughout his life (for example, donating $20,000 of his graduate school money to Oxford Famine Relief Fund).
Also, evaluate the choices he made and the life he lived. What is admirable, what do you find problematic with the choices he made? Explain.
(the list and your evaluation should be about 1 page or so).
Final draft of your Gothic Tale with your roughest, rough draft.
Homework for Wednesday--review "Death of an Innocent" and make a list of the anti-establishment (unconventional choices) he made throughout his life (for example, donating $20,000 of his graduate school money to Oxford Famine Relief Fund).
Also, evaluate the choices he made and the life he lived. What is admirable, what do you find problematic with the choices he made? Explain.
(the list and your evaluation should be about 1 page or so).
11/3
Finish Classicism/Romanticism--analysis of paintings.

Truman Capote's "Miriam"
JT--record your perceptions of the story. Write a brief summary, identify the main characters, the conflict, and any possible symbols.
Discussion questions for analysis.

If time work on your own Gothic Tales. Focus on character motivations and traits. Are symbols present in your story? If so, what are they and how do they relate to the main idea?

Final draft of gothic tale will be due Monday, 11/8.

Also, read "Death of an Innocent" by Jon Krakauer for Monday, 11/8/10 (in your anthology, page 78-93).
11/2
JT--describe your reaction to "A Rose for Emily"

"A Rose for Emily"
Discuss the characterization, narration, gothic elements, and questions you have.



Tonight's Homework--read "Miriam"
and revise your Gothic Tales.


Tomorrow is the deadline for turning in your permission slip and $16 check to NDS.

Final draft of gothic tale will be due Monday, 11/8.
Also, read "Death of an Innocent" by Jon Krakauer for Monday, 11/8/10
11/1
"C"
Revise gothic tale--see me for handout

Homework--please ask your teachers and a parent/guardian to sign your permission slip. These are due tomorrow with a $16 check made out to Sion.

Read William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" in anthology on page 64.
gothic tale rough draft
Final draft of gothic tale will be due Monday, 11/8.
10/29
Poe Literary Festival--thanks to all the cooks who made festive treats for the celebration.

Homework--rough draft of gothic tale due Monday.


Also, if you were absent on Friday, be sure to pick up a field-trip permission slip. Have your teachers sign, make out a check for $16 to Notre Dame de Sion, and turn in by Tuesday, 11/2.
Group analysis over Poe short story.
Note--If you plan on attending Edgar Allan Poe Haunted House, there's a possibility for a little extra credit. Be sure you make observations and write down connections to the short stories we've read this week.
10/28
Vocabulary unit 6 quiz.

Edgar Allan Poe Literary Festival

Homework--finish the class assignment over your short story. In addition read one of the other Poe stories for homework tomorrow:
"The Fall of the House of Usher"
"The Black Cat"
"The Cask of Amontillado"
"The Pit and the Pendulum"
"The Tell-Tale Heart"

Edgar Allan Poe Stories
Vocabulary unit 6
Rough draft--gothic tale
10/27
JT--define what you see as the symbolism of the Minister's Black Veil. Consider the following:
  • the note at the beginning
  • the passages where the minister speaks directly about the veil
  • specific things the townspeople do and say in response to the minister's wearing the veil
Ipad--read "The Raven" & your assigned Poe short story.
Whatever you don't finish in class will be assigned reading for tonight. See this link to read the story online:
Edgar Allan Poe

Vocabulary unit 6 quiz tomorrow (Thursday, 10/28/10)
Romanticism paragraph using 8 vocabulary words from unit 6.
Poe Literary Festival Celebration on Friday
Sign up here if you'd like to bring something:

2nd Hour Treat Sign-Up

3rd Hour Treat Sign-Up
10/26
Individually, complete "Dr. H's" worksheet. Due at the end of the hour.

Read Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil"
  • read actively
  • annotate
  • look up unfamiliar diction

Expository paragraph defining Romanticism using 8 of the unit 6 vocabulary words due tomorrow.
Dr. H worksheet
Vocabulary unit 6 quiz on Thursday.

Edgar Allan Poe Literary Festival coming up, stay tuned for details.
10/25
"B"
JT--make connections between Crucible and Poe's "Masque of the Red Death." Also, consider Prince Prospero's reaction to the red death and make a modern-day connection.

Vocabulary Unit 6--in addition to vocabulary quiz, please select 8 of the words in unit 6 and write an expository paragraph defining the literary movement romanticism (41-44) in anthology. Due Wednesday.

Definitions for allegory and symbol are in the back of your anthology in the literary term section.

"Masque of the Red Death"

Homework--read Hawthorne's short story "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" in anthology for tomorrow. Read actively, annotate, look up words you don't know, and figure out tone, meaning.

Vocabulary unit 6 quiz on Thursday.

Edgar Allan Poe Literary Festival coming up, stay tuned for details.

Vocabulary Unit 6--in addition to vocabulary quiz, please select 8 of the words in unit 6 and write an expository paragraph defining the literary movement romanticism (41-44) in anthology. Due Wednesday.
10/22
In-class essay over The Crucible

For Monday, vocabulary unit 6.

Anthology reading for Monday:
read "American Romanticism" & "The Age of Romanticism" 41-44 & "The Masque of the Red Death" by Edgar Allan Poe. Consider your favorite Edgar Allan Poe stories for our Poe Literary Festival (just in time for Halloween).
essay
For Monday, vocabulary unit 6.

Anthology reading for Monday:
read "American Romanticism" & "The Age of Romanticism" 41-44 & "The Masque of the Red Death" by Edgar Allan Poe. Consider your favorite Edgar Allan Poe stories for our Poe Literary Festival (just in time for Halloween).
10/21
The Crucible Socratic Seminar--excellent discussion, girls.
If absent, please see me Friday.
2nd Hour Notes
3rd Hour Notes

The Crucible In-class essay tomorrow. You may bring your plays and dialectical journals.

For Monday, vocabulary unit 6.

Anthology reading for Monday:
read "American Romanticism" & "The Age of Romanticism" 41-44 & "The Masque of the Red Death" by Edgar Allan Poe. Consider your favorite Edgar Allan Poe stories for our Poe Literary Festival (just in time for Halloween).
10/20
Present "Half-Hanged Mary"

Finish Act IV questions & discussion
Socratic Seminar over Crucible

Homework
The Crucible introduction by Christopher Bigsby.

Socratic Seminar ?
The Crucible essay on Friday.
10/19
Small groups--compare and revise theme statements. Read Margaret Atwood's "Half-Hanged Mary" and make connections to The Crucible. For your assigned stanza:
  1. denotation and connotation of diction
  2. summarize
  3. identify figures of speech or vivid imagery and make inferences
  4. identify the tone of the stanza--what is the attitude's speaker toward the subject?
  5. connections to Crucible

Select seminar question for tomorrow's discussion.

Homework-- a minimum of one-typed page answering your SS question. Make sure you have evidence to back up your insight.

Also, read Arthur Miller's "Tragedy and the Common Man." Consider John Proctor as a tragic hero in relation to Miller's essay.

Act IV Crucible questions.
The Crucible essay on Friday.

Vocabulary unit 6--due Monday.

Now that you've finished the play, read The Crucible introduction by Christopher Bigsby.
10/18
"A"
JT--revisit The Crucible anticipation questions you answered before you began the play. Apply to John Proctor and The Crucible. Consider your own life. Have your ideas changed? Why?

Finish Act 4

Act IV discussion questions handout--answer the journal topic/theme statements and three other questions for tomorrow's class.
Act 4 dialectical journal.
The Crucible essay on Thursday.

Vocabulary unit 6--due Thursday.

Now that you've finished the play, read The Crucible introduction by Christopher Bigsby.
10/15
Unit 5 vocabulary quiz

Finish courtroom scene.

Acts 1-3 discussion questions.

The Crucible--finish the play for Monday & complete at least four dialectical journal entries. Please label correctly. Make sure one of your four entries focuses on a major character in the last act.
Check Act 3 dialectical journal entries.
Socratic Seminar discussion on Tuesday.

Crucible exam on Wednesday.
10/14
Watch Crucible Act 2-3 in class.

Unit 5 vocabulary quiz tomorrow

The Crucible--finish Act 4 for Monday.
10/12
No JT today.

The Crucible- assigned small groups and questions for discussion over Acts 1 & 2.

Homework for Thursday--read all of Act 3 in The Crucible. For your dialectical journal response, continue tracking the cultural climate you responded to in Act 1 (authority, hysteria, guilt, or hypocrisy). Complete four entries for 10/13/10, making a grand total of 12 entries over the entire play thus far. Remember to label correctly with page number next to the summary, paraphrase, or quotation in the column on the left and your response on the right. Also, draw a horizontal line to distinguish specific dialectical journal assignments.

The Crucible--finish Act 4 for Monday.
10/11
"C"
JT--listen for your assigned character. Create a character sketch with all of the following information/inferences from the play:
  • physical characteristics
  • actions
  • personality traits, mannerisms, & motivations
  • values, beliefs, & goals
  • what others say about him/her
  • overwhelming conflict, both internal and external
  • predictions of future actions based on this information
  • an important line or two which depicts the character's essence


Act 1 & 2 discussion

Continue reading the play.

Homework--Finish reading Act 2 for tomorrow & complete three more entries in your dialectical journal. Please label with Act, date, and page number.
Three more dialectical journal entries (for a total of five so far for Acts 1 & 2). At least four unit 5 vocabulary words have been used.
The Crucible--finish Act 2 for Tuesday and Act 3 for Thursday.


Unit 5 Vocabulary Quiz Friday.
10/8
JT--listen to list of statements, write a "+" or a "-" next to each numbered statement. Briefly explain your answer.

Finish "The Lottery"

The Crucible Q&A

Homework
The Crucible
For Monday, read the rest of Act 1 and part of Act 2 (stop at the point when Rev. Hale enters the Proctor's home--around page 59-62, depending on your text).
Record three more entries (for a total of five so far for Acts 1 & 2).
For these three entries, use at least four of your unit 5 vocabulary words.

The Crucible

Unit 5 Vocabulary Quiz Friday.
10/7
JT--Describe your reaction to "The Lottery"

Check unit 5 vocabulary.

"The Lottery" questions and discussion.

Tonight--read to the bottom of page 30 in Act I of The Crucible & record two dialectical journal entries.


For Monday, read the rest of Act 1 and part of Act 2 (stop at the point when Rev. Hale enters the Proctor's home--around page 59-62, depending on your text). Record three more entries (for a total of five so far for Acts 1 & 2).
For these three entries, use at least four of your unit 5 vocabulary words.
10/6
JT--Contrast the dichotomy of Jonathan Edwards' character between that of a fire & brimstone preacher from "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" and the peaceful, nature-loving man from Esther Edwards' journal.

Assigned passage in "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
  • look up unfamiliar diction
  • paraphrase or summarize the passage
  • identify the most crucial line
  • analyze the effectiveness of the literary devices including imagery, figures of speech, and detail. What effect do these devices have on the tone of the message?


Tonight read "The Literature of Colonial America" (on-line PDF) and Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" on page 35 in the anthology.


Bring vocabulary unit 5 to class Thursday.

For Friday read Act one of Arthur Miller's The Crucible (to page 30 at the bottom of the page before Rev. John Hale enters).
10/5
Week
B
JT--Based on the poetry of Anne Bradstreet and the alphabet of the New England Primer, make inferences about Puritan beliefs.
Have you ever lost something that was dear to you? Describe and explain that feeling of loss.

Volunteers to read excerpts from personal essays.

Finish PSAT practice. For additional practice tests, Cracking the PSAT by Princeton Review is an excellent resource.

Anne Bradstreet poetry & The New England Primer.

For Wednesday, 10/6 read
  • "Jonathan Edwards"
  • "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
  • from the Journals of Jonathan Edwards
  • Vocabulary unit 5 due
The Personal Essay with rubric
For Thursday, please read "The Literature of Colonial America" (will be posted) & "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson.
10/1
JT--Recall vivid details from either of Sedaris's essays, "Giant Dreams, Midget Abilities" or "Consider the Stars." How are both titles clever?

Continue PSAT packet.

For Tuesday, 10/5 read the following in the anthology:
  • The New England Primer
  • "To My Dear and Loving Husband"
  • "Versus Upon the Burning of Our House"
Final Draft of Personal Essay is due

For Wednesday, 10/6 read
  • "Jonathan Edwards"
  • "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
  • from the Journals of Jonathan Edwards
  • Vocabulary unit 5 due

For Thursday, 10/7
  • "The Lottery" and bring The Crucible by Arthur Miller to class
9/30
No JT
Vocabulary Unit 4 Quiz
PSAT Review




For Friday read David Sedaris in your new anthology.
  • "Giant Dreams, Midget Abilities" 250-258
  • "Consider the Stars" 264-270

Continue revising/editing your personal essay. Final draft due Tuesday, 10/5.
Vocabulary Unit 4
For Tuesday, 10/5 read the following in the anthology:
  • The New England Primer
  • "To My Dear and Loving Husband"
  • "Versus Upon the Burning of Our House"
  • Final Draft of your personal essay is due

For Wednesday, 10/6 read
  • "Jonathan Edwards"
  • "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
  • from the Journals of Jonathan Edwards
  • Vocabulary unit 5 due

For Thursday, 10/7
  • "The Lottery" and bring The Crucible by Arthur Miller to class
9/29
Welcome back, girls!

Check 2nd part of personal essay rough draft.

Listen to essay by Sarah Vowell, "Shooting Dad"

Homework tonight

Vocabulary unit 4 quiz tomorrow

Complete the PSAT practice booklet
  • "Critical Reading" 8-16
  • "Writing Skills" 29-33
  • Practice full-length PSAT packet (a separate insert & the title reads, "Practice with this full-length PSAT/NMSQT"

Vocabulary commonly seen on the PSAT/SAT (list from The Princeton Review Word Smart)

Personal essay--2nd part of the rough draft.
Personal Essay Assignment--see file for details.
Final Draft due Tuesday, 10/5. Please think of a creative title for your essay.

For Friday read David Sedaris in your new anthology.
  • "Giant Dreams, Midget Abilities" 250-258
  • "Consider the Stars" 264-270

For Tuesday, 10/5 read the following in the anthology:
  • The New England Primer
  • "To My Dear and Loving Husband"
  • "Versus Upon the Burning of Our House"
  • Final Draft of your personal essay is due

For Wednesday, 10/6 read
  • "Jonathan Edwards"
  • "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
  • from the Journals of Jonathan Edwards
  • Vocabulary unit 5 due

For Thursday, 10/7
  • "The Lottery" and bring The Crucible by Arthur Miller to class
9/27
Check vocabulary unit 4.

No journal topic.

Read "Spin" again and look at style.

Sample Essay--listen.
Personal essay rough draft (check)
Personal Essay Assignment--see file for details. The second two pages of the rough draft are due Wednesday, 9/30.

Vocabulary unit 4 quiz on Thursday.

Complete the PSAT practice booklet for Thursday:
  • "Prepare for the Test" 8-16
  • "Writing Skills" 29-33
  • Practice full-length PSAT packet
9/24
TTTC exam (mostly essay); you may use your books.

Personal Essay Assignment--see file for details. The first two pages of the rough draft are due Monday, 9/27.


Vocabulary unit 4 due Monday.
TTTC Exam
Personal Essay Assignment--see file for details. The first two pages of the rough draft are due Monday, 9/27.

Vocabulary unit 4 due Monday.

Complete the PSAT practice booklet for Thursday:
  • "Prepare for the Test" 8-16
  • "Writing Skills" 29-33
  • Practice full-length PSAT packet
9/23
Again, girls, excellent Soctratic Seminar today. See links below for an overview of discussion.
2nd Hour TTTC SS 9/23

3rd Hour TTTC SS 9/23

Tomorrow, you may use your books for the in-class essay over TTTC//.

Personal Essay Assignment--see file for details. The first two pages of the rough draft are due Monday, 9/27.

Vocabulary unit 4 due Monday.

Complete the PSAT practice booklet for Thursday:
  • "Prepare for the Test" 8-16
  • "Writing Skills" 29-33
  • Practice full-length PSAT packet
9/22
JT--Evaluate the novel. Is TTTC a war story or something else? Explain. Has your perception of story been enhanced or altered in some way? What is the value of reading/listening to stories? How did the last chapter "The Lives of the Dead" create closure?

Socratic Seminar--TTTC (see attached rubric for guidelines)


2nd Hour Discussion
2nd Hour TTTC SS 9/22

3rd Hour Discussion
3rd Hour TTTC SS 9/22

Homework:
Review the novel in preparation for the exam Friday.
Review question #11 and think about possible answers for tomorrow's discussion.


Vocabulary unit 4 due Monday.
SS Discussion question (1-2 pages) with supporting evidence.
Personal Essay-details to come Thursday.

Vocabulary unit 4 due Monday.

Complete the PSAT practice booklet for Tuesday:
  • "Prepare for the Test" 8-16
  • "Writing Skills" 29-33
  • Practice full-length PSAT packet
9/21
Vocabulary unit 3 quiz.

JT--Examine the character you selected in chapter 1 "The Things They Carried." Consider how your character has changed physically, emotionally, or completely (through death). Examine the baggage he carried both physically and metaphorically. What seemed to weigh the most? Why?

Examine "The Ghost Soldiers" and "Night Life" in more detail.

TTTC Socratic Seminar discussion question--select one, examine closely, and type a full to two page response using your insight and supporting evidence from the text (including page numbers).

TTTC Finish the novel for tomorrow (read "The Lives of the Dead")

Essay will be Thursday or Friday (depending on Wednesday's SS)

TTTC Socratic Seminar discussion question--select one, examine closely, and type a full to two page response using your insight and supporting evidence from the text (including page numbers).

TTTC Finish the novel for tomorrow (read "The Lives of the Dead")

Essay will be Thursday or Friday depending on Wednesday's SS.
9/20
"C" week
JT--What do "In the Field," "Good Form," & "Field Trip" all have in common? What is the tone of these chapters? Explain. Record any and all questions you have over the reading.

Discussion Questions

For Tuesday, 9/21 read TTTC
  • "The Ghost Soldiers"
  • "Night Life"

Vocabulary unit 3 quiz Tuesday--you're also responsible for units 1 & 2.

For Wednesday, 9/22 read TTTC
  • "The Lives of the Dead"

Socratic Seminar--Wednesday & Thursday

Essay Exam over TTTC--Friday
9/17
Unit 3 Vocabulary--check answers to exercises, quiz Tuesday.

Discuss your interview findings from Wednesday.

JT--O'Brien says, "By telling stories, you objectify your own experience. You separate it from yourself. You pin down certain truths. You make up others. You start sometimes with an incident that truly happened, like the night in the * field, and you carry it forward by inventing incidents that did not in fact occur but that nonethless help to clarify and explain" (158). Comment on this passage.


Discussion


  • parallel/recurring events
  • tone of passage
  • Norman's conflict, narrator, and effect
  • extended metaphor
  • audience within "Speaking of Courage"
  • Is it a "True War Story"? why?
  • Style of "Notes"
  • additional questions you have

Homework for Monday, 9/20 read TTTC


  • "In the Field"
  • "Good Form"
  • "Field Trip"

For Tuesday, 9/21 read TTTC
  • "The Ghost Soldiers"
  • "Night Life"

For Wednesday, 9/22 read TTTC
  • "The Lives of the Dead"


Unit 3 Vocabulary Quiz--Tuesday
9/16
JT--Consider an important passage from last night's reading. Briefly paraphrase/summarize. Respond to the passage. Why is it important within the context of the rest of the novel?

Conclusion about interview--discuss findings. What in your two stories were similar? What differed?

Superstition and Faith discussion.

"The Man I Killed" & Thomas Hardy's "The Man He Killed"--
compare the two.


Check Vocabulary unit 3 Friday.


For Friday, read TTTC
  • "Speaking of Courage"
  • "Notes"

Remember, to read actively and critically. Any new reading may be accompanied by a check-for-reading quiz.

Vocabulary Unit 3 due Friday.


For Friday, read TTTC
  • "Speaking of Courage"
  • "Notes"

For Monday, 9/20 read TTTC
  • "In the Field"
  • "Good Form"
  • "Field Trip"

For Tuesday, 9/21 read TTTC
  • "The Ghost Soldiers"
  • "Night Life"

For Wednesday, 9/22 read TTTC
  • "The Lives of the Dead"
9/15
PSAT Presentation by Ms. Westenfeld.

Complete yesterday's criteria of "How To Tell A True War Story" & examine
  • "On the Rainy River"
  • "Enemies"
  • "Friends"
  • "The Dentist"
  • "Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong"

No new reading for Wednesday but for Thursday, please read the following from TTTC:
  • "Stocking"
  • "Church"
  • "The Man I Killed"
  • "Ambush"
  • "Style"
check--interview
Remember, to read actively and critically. Any new reading may be accompanied by a check-for-reading quiz.

Vocabulary Unit 3 due Friday.

No new reading for Wednesday but for Thursday, please read the following from TTTC:
  • "Stocking"
  • "Church"
  • "The Man I Killed"
  • "Ambush"
  • "Style"

For Friday, read TTTC
  • "Speaking of Courage"
  • "Notes"

For Monday, 9/20 read TTTC
  • "In the Field"
  • "Good Form"
  • "Field Trip"

For Tuesday, 9/21 read TTTC
  • "The Ghost Soldiers"
  • "Night Life"

For Wednesday, 9/22 read TTTC
  • "The Lives of the Dead"
9/14
Vocabulary unit 2 Quiz


The Things They Carried
Record all the ways O'Brien tells of "How to Tell a True War Story."
Based on the aforementioned criteria, does "The Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong" qualify? Why or why not?

Small groups assigned one of the following short stories. Briefly summarize, identify the narrator, and record your observations whether or not this is a true war story.
Again, based on the aforementioned criteria, evaluate the following (& catch up on discussion):


  • "On the Rainy River"
  • "Enemies"
  • "Friends"
  • "The Dentist"
  • "Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong"

Writing homework--interview a member of your family to ask his/her opinion of the same story you recorded for yesterday's journal topic. If two family members are involved, interview them separately.This is due Wednesday.
Unit 2 Vocabulary
Remember, to read actively and critically. Any new reading may be accompanied by a check-for-reading quiz.

Vocabulary Unit 3 due Friday.

No new reading for Wednesday but for Thursday, please read the following from TTTC:
  • "Stocking"
  • "Church"
  • "The Man I Killed"
  • "Ambush"
  • "Style"

For Friday, read TTTC
  • "Speaking of Courage"
  • "Notes"

For Monday, 9/20 read TTTC
  • "In the Field"
  • "Good Form"
  • "Field Trip"

For Tuesday, 9/21 read TTTC
  • "The Ghost Soldiers"
  • "Night Life"

For Wednesday, 9/22 read TTTC
  • "The Lives of the Dead"
9/13
"B" Week
JT--O'Brien begins to blur the line between truth and fiction. To look at this in your own life, recall and record a "true" story about you or your family. What makes your family unique?
Consider the following:
  • earliest memory of your mother, father, or sibling
  • how/when your parents/grandparents met
  • when your family first arrived in this country
  • first day in a new school
  • your first experience driving

Your questions over "How to Tell a True War Story." Small groups will answer one assigned question, plus #7 & #11.

Reading homework--TTTC "The Dentist" and "The Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong" for Tuesday. Now that you understand what constitutes a "true war story," keep in mind this criteria as you read "The Sweetheart..." If it's not factually true, what is O'Brien trying to convey?

Writing homework--interview a member of your family to ask his/her opinion of the same story you recorded for the journal topic today. If two family members are involved, interview them separately.This is due Wednesday.

Unit 2 Vocabulary Quiz tomorrow.

Remember, to read actively and critically. Any new reading may be accompanied by a check-for-reading quiz.

Vocabulary Unit 3 due Friday.


No new reading for Wednesday but for Thursday, please read the following from TTTC:
  • "Stocking"
  • "Church"
  • "The Man I Killed"
  • "Ambush"
  • "Style"

For Friday, read TTTC
  • "Speaking of Courage"
  • "Notes"
9/10
"On the Rainy River" RQ

JT--on handout over "Spin" & "On the Rainy River"

Check vocabulary unit 2

The Things They Carried--small group discussion and analysis questions.
"Love"
"Spin"
"On the Rainy River"

Homework for Monday--read the next three chapters.


  • "Enemies"
  • "Friends"
  • "How to Tell a True War Story"
As you read "How to Tell a True War Story," underline or record all the ways to tell a "true" war story. Reminder, there's always the possibility of a reading quiz, so do yourselves a favor and read the assignment!

For Monday, read "Enemies," "Friends," and "How to Tell a True War Story," (62-85).
As you read "How to Tell a True War Story," underline or record all the ways to tell a "true" war story.

Vocabulary unit 2 quiz Tuesday.
9/9
JT--in works of literary merit, authors usually introduce important themes/motifs in the first chapter. Based on the events thus far, list some important themes in TTTC.

Whole class discussion over character inferences. Make predictions and take copious notes.

Begin reading tomorrow's assignment (if time).

Homework (due tomorrow, 9/10)
The Things They Carried

  • "Love"
  • "Spin"
  • "One the Rainy River"
As you read "On the Rainy River," bear in mind Tim's inner conflict. What must he decide to do? What decision does he make? Why?

Bring Vocabulary to class tomorrow.
Character lists and inferences.
For Monday, read "Enemies," "Friends," How to Tell a True War Story," and "The Dentist" (62-85). As you read "How to Tell a True War Story," underline or record all the ways to tell a "true" war story.

Vocabulary unit 2 quiz Tuesday.
9/8
JT--Record your reaction to some of the events in the first chapter. Select an important passage, re-read, summarize, and record your response. What makes it effective?
Which parts of the story do you think are based on the author's memory of actual lists, characters, and experiences?

TTTC--chapter 1 discussion questions. In small groups of two-three, read the question and discuss. Using supporting evidence from the text, record your group's response.

Homework--sign up for a character from TTTC . Carefully re-read the first chapter. As you read, record the specific items your assigned character carries (including page numbers). After you have finished the list, make some insight assertions about your character (1/2-1 full page).

Vocabulary unit 2 due tomorrow.

If absent Tuesday, please take Vocabulary unit 1 quiz during lunch study hall today (Wed.)
2nd & 3rd hours: finish check your brain-storming/pre-writing from 9/1 & 9/3

Please hold onto both of these for a future writing assignment.
Vocabulary--complete unit 2 for Thursday. Quiz will be Tuesday.

New novel--The Things They Carried. Bring to class every day this week.
9/7
"A"
Journal Topic--look in your purse or tote. List some of the items you carry. Select a few and reflect--what do these objects say about you?

The Things They Carried ( if absent, please pick up military terms from me).
Look at title/dedication pages. Make inferences.
Importance of story. Look at the ending of Krik? Krak!
Also, make inferences about style/tone of O'Brien's work.

Reading homework--read the first chapter of TTTC (same chapter title as the book). Use your handout to decipher what the soldiers carry. Record questions as you read. Annotating is helpful but not mandatory.

Vocabulary
Vocabulary unit 1 quiz.
Complete unit 2 for Thursday.

Finish SR presentations
2nd Hour- I checked
brain-storming of childhood
memory from 9/3. I also checked the pre-writing of your favorite childhood stories from 9/1

3rd Hour-I'll check your brain-storming/pre-writing Wednesday.

Please hold onto both of these for a future writing assignment.
Vocabulary--complete unit 2 for Thursday.

New novel--The Things They Carried. Bring to class every day this week.
9/3
In-class essay over summer reading.

Homework:

Reading
In preparation for the personal essay, read chapter 11 in The College Writer , "Description and Reflection," pages 155-172.

Writing
Pre-writing: instead of writing about your favorite childhood stories, recall a vivid childhood memory. Close your eyes, place yourself in that moment. Record what you see, hear, smell, sense. Try to record a full page of detail.

Vocabulary unit 1 quiz--Tuesday.

Bring Tim O'Brien's TTTC to class on Tuesday.
In-class essay
see column to the left
9/2
Finish presenting summer reading.

2nd Hour Presentations:





Extremely Loud 2nd Hour


Homework--review your summer reading for tomorrow's in-class essay.
I will present you with a thematic question and you'll select a work to answer the prompt (you must chose a work you read but one you and your group members did not present). You may use your notes on this first essay.


See the handout below for help:


Out-of-class Writing Assignment, The Personal Essay (more details to come).

Bring Tim O'Brien's TTTC to class on Tuesday.

Vocabulary Unit 1 test--Tuesday.

3rd Hour Presentations:







9/1
Continue presenting summer reading. As an audience, listen attentively, take notes, and stay engaged. In-class essay over summer reading will be Friday.

Reading homework:
FInd your College Writer from last year.
Read "Narration and Description," pages 131-154 for Thursday.


Writing homework:
Begin thinking of your favorite childhood stories, brainstorm and record titles and impressions/images connected to these childhood stories. Please have at least one page of rough brainstorming ideas.
Voc. unit 1 paragraphs
Vocabulary Unit 1 quiz--Tuesday.

Reading homework:
FInd your College Writer from last year.
Read "Narration and Description," pages 131-154 for Thursday.


Writing homework:
Begin thinking of your favorite childhood stories, brainstorm and record titles and impressions/images connected to these childhood stories. Please have at least one page of rough brainstorming ideas.
Bring Tim O'Brien's TTTC to class on Tuesday.
8/31
JT--freewrite

Check unit 1 vocabulary.

Continue SR presentations--take copious notes; you will write an in-class essay over a summer reading work that you did not present.

2nd Hour
  • The Glass Castle 2GC


3rd Hour
  • Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
3ExtLoudIncClose

Homework for tomorrow--using all twelve unit 1 vocabulary words, write a 3/4-one page story. Underline the words and make sure they're used correctly in context (part of speech).
Vocabulary unit 1
Unit 1 Vocabulary Quiz-Friday.


FInd your College Writer from last year.
Read "Narration and Description," pages 131-154 for Thursday.
Begin thinking of your favorite childhood stories, brainstorm and record titles and impressions/images connected to these childhood stories.

8/30
"C"
Go over unit 1 vocabulary words.

Summer Reading Presentations

Vocabulary Homework-->complete unit 1.
SR presentations
In-class essay over one of the works you did not do a presentation over (Wed/Thurs).

Find Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried and bring to class Friday
8/27
Time in class to complete Summer Reading Presentations.

For Monday, each group needs to be ready to present (summary, individual analysis, visual piece).
See attached grading rubric:


Sample project from last year:
Life of Pi 2

Please bring vocabulary books to class on Monday.
8/26
Complete group summary for your assigned summer reading work.

As a small group, discuss possible themes (so you're all working toward a common end).

Select a scene from the assigned work to recreate or to share a visual.
Check individual analysis--rough draft (thinking stage).
Summer Reading--group presentations due Monday.
See attached document:

8/25
Finish going over course expectations.
Finish class introductions.
Small groups assigned for summer reading presentations.
Move to your assigned groups, take out last night's homework. Silently exchange with a partner. Read and respond in a small group discussion.
Homework--create/remember gmail account, start a document/presentation, invite the members of your group (please include me at mwilcox4@gmail.com)

I need to see evidence of some thinking tomorrow in class (rough draft form). 1/2 page-full due over your assigned selection.

Final presentations will be due Monday, 8/30.

2nd hour meet in the library Friday; 3rd hour meet in the library Thursday and Friday.
Check last night's homework.


Class expectation signature page
Summer Reading--group presentations due Monday.
See attached document:



Also, tonight make sure you create/remember a gmail account.
It's easy and free.

My gmail is mwilcox4@gmail.com

When you invite group members to your document, make sure you include me.

Sample project from last year:
Life of Pi 2
8/24
Reading Quiz over Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close & choice novel.


Homework--from each of your summer reading works, find a particularly vivid passage (one full of intense imagery). Carefully re-read, briefly summarize, record the chapter/page number, and discuss the significance of the passage.
Class expectations signature page
Summer Reading Presentations-
please bring your SR books to class this week and next.
8/23
If you are
absent
today,
RQ make-
ups
will be tomorrow
during
lunch/SH
Happy Monday.

Reading Quiz over The Glass Castle

Homework--review Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close & your choice novel from SR for tomorrow's reading quiz.

Turn in abridged version of the English II H course expectations by Thursday. Please remember to share these with your parents and have them sign.
The Glass Castle RQ
Quizzes over summer reading today and Tuesday.

1st novel after summer reading:
The Things They Carried
8/19
JT--freewrite for five minutes. Put pen to paper and let your ideas pour forth (that's the only rule: pen to paper for 5).


Interview a peer


  • exchange letters of introduction
  • collectively create 10 interview questions--consider those you normally wouldn't discover in an English class
  • interview & introduce your partner to the class
Homework--review your summer reading novels and prepare for your check-for-reading quizzes on Monday and Tuesday.
A Letter of
Introduction
1st novel after summer reading:
The Things They Carried
8/18
JT--"I write; therefore I am"
What does this mean to you?
Why read literature? Record all responses.

Create small groups of 2-3 and share your answers. Please introduce yourself first.
Consolidate and share with the class.

Look at the "why read literature?" questions and try to condense your response to 20 characters or less.

Website introduction, syllabus, answer garden.

Introduce yourself writing assignment due tomorrow, 8/19/10

1st novel after summer reading:
The Things They Carried
8/17
JT--Freewrite about your expectations, strengths, and weaknesses.
What are you looking forward to in this class?

Necessary school supplies:
  • 1" binder for this class (optional)
  • notebook/composition notebook
  • loose-leaf notebook paper (college rule preferred)
  • blue &/or black pens
  • post-it-notes (optional)
n/a
1st novel after summer reading:
The Things They Carried