Date

Today's Lesson & Homework

Turned In

Long-Term

5/3
Multiple Choice practice and tips.

Reminders:
  • Don't forget about breakfast on Thursday at 7:15 in the OGS.
  • Remember to bring blue/black pens, two sharpened #2 pencils, and a good eraser.
  • Leave your cell phones in your lockers.
  • Get plenty of sleep between now and Thursday.
  • If you review (which I recommend), review the possible Q3 titles you feel passionate about and could write over extensively. Don't forget to review author names and spellings. Underline titles!
  • You're ready! Be confident in yourself and your voice.
Multiple Choice practice passages (poem and prose pieces)
AP Literature and Composition Exam Thursday, May 5th. Meet for breakfast in the OGS by 7:15.
5/2
Exam Prep--Q2 focus, a sample prompt from Ann Petry's novel The Street. Annotate passage and write introduction, discuss briefly, review sample passages, and turn in your work.

If absent because of AP Chem or other reason, please review your Q3 works of literary merit, tone list, literary terms, old essays, etc. See the AP Advice handout I gave you a couple of weeks ago.

7th Hour--Wuthering Heights (Friday), Beloved (today).

5th Hour--Wuthering Heights (Friday), Crime and Punishment (today).
Q2 sample prompt
See Q3 presentations below and please remember, these are one person's insights into the works. Ultimately, you need to rely on your own understanding of a piece of literature (there might be content with which you disagree or you would have selected something else to focus on).


If you completed the American Literature multiple choice practice, the click on the attachment to see answers/explanations:

4/29
Exam Prep--excellent work, girls.

Review, review, review!

Notre Dame de Sion Reading List (2007-2011)
I provided a list of titles you've read over the years; make sure you also know the authors.
4/27
John Donne's Holy Sonnet X "Death Be Not Proud"
  • how would you handle this poem
  • paraphrase quatrains
  • analyze the speaker
  • tone
  • discuss

Q1 Poetry Prompt--Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost. Read the prompt and analyze the poems. Write an introduction. Read a sample essay and evaluate.

Review, Review, Review! You've worked so hard this year; it would be a shame to give up now. See the student reviews in the next column.


All of the Q3 google doc AP reviews have been posted at this time.

AP Literature and Composition Q3 Review Presentations.

Click on the link below to view the Google.doc


5th Hour
Metamorphosis--5th Hourr

Wuthering Heights--5th

Hamlet--5th Hour

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead--5th Hour

Crime and Punishment--5th

Beloved--5th Hour

Pride and Prejudice--5th Hour

The Great Gatsby--5th Hour

Atonement--5th

7th Hour

Metamorphosis--7th Hour

Lying Awake--7th

Wuthering Heights--7th

The Great Gatsby-7th Hour

Hamlet--7th Hour

Atonement--7th

Crime and Punishment--7th

Beloved--7th
4/26
Pass back Atonement essays.

Wit Socratic Seminar

AP Review--due tomorrow
Wit--SS discussion
AP Review over major works of literature will be due Wednesday, 4/27. See me if you haven't signed up for a work of literature. Create a google doc, invite me (mwilcox4@gmail.com) and the other group members.
Please type your name next to the sections you complete so that I may give you credit.
In addition to the review, make sure you connect to at least two chapters in Foster's How to Read Literature Like a Professor.
In your review of major works, include the following:
  • author, genre of writing, time period written, title
  • major, minor characters and their most notable traits
  • plot elements (setting, conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion)
  • two major themes
  • point of view of the work and how it makes a difference
  • stylistic devices (symbol, allusion, figures of speech, diction, syntax, etc.)
  • a profound quotation or two
  • two connections to Foster's HTRLLP
4/21
JT--evaluate Wit is a work of literature. What did you enjoy, find difficult? What questions/observations do you have?

AP Advice-handout (see me, please)

AP British Poetry multiple choice answers:



Select Wit SS discussion question--due Tuesday (1/2-a full page analysis, depending on your question).

AP Review over major works of literature will be due Wednesday, 4/27. See me if you haven't signed up for a work of literature. Create a google doc, invite me (mwilcox4@gmail.com) and the other group members.
Please type your name next to the sections you complete so that I may give you credit.
In addition to the review, make sure you connect to at least two chapters in Foster's How to Read Literature Like a Professor.
In your review of major works, include the following:
  • author, genre of writing, time period written, title
  • major, minor characters and their most notable traits
  • plot elements (setting, conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion)
  • two major themes
  • point of view of the work and how it makes a difference
  • stylistic devices (symbol, allusion, figures of speech, diction, syntax, etc.)
  • a profound quotation or two
  • two connections to Foster's HTRLLP
4/20
Continue examination of "Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"

Practice prompt over a section of the poem.

Homework for Thursday--finish reading Margaret Edson's Wit for Thursday (45-85).

Reminders:
  • Please give Ms. K-West copies of all scholarship letters you've received.
  • We'll buy your College Writers. Please consider selling them back so we may acquire class sets.
Prufrock prompt
AP Review over major works of literature will be due Wednesday, 4/27. See me if you haven't signed up for a work of literature. Create a google doc, invite me (mwilcox4@gmail.com) and the other group members.
Please type your name next to the sections you complete so that I may give you credit.
In addition to the review, make sure you connect to at least two chapters in Foster's How to Read Literature Like a Professor.
In your review of major works, include the following:
  • author, genre of writing, time period written, title
  • major, minor characters and their most notable traits
  • plot elements (setting, conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion)
  • two major themes
  • point of view of the work and how it makes a difference
  • stylistic devices (symbol, allusion, figures of speech, diction, syntax, etc.)
  • a profound quotation or two
  • two connections to Foster's HTRLLP
4/19
Fill our college acceptance surveys and vote for awards.

"Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," page 925 (title, speaker, situation) and explore specific assigned question. Present tomorrow before looking at a practice prompt.

Homework for Wednesday--read Margaret Edson's Wit (pages 1-44). Finish the play for Thursday (45-85).

AP Review over major works of literature will be due Wednesday, 4/27. See me if you haven't signed up for a work of literature. Create a google doc, invite me (mwilcox4@gmail.com) and the other group members.
Please type your name next to the sections you complete so that I may give you credit.
In addition to the review, make sure you connect to at least two chapters in Foster's How to Read Literature Like a Professor.
In your review of major works, include the following:
  • author, genre of writing, time period written, title
  • major, minor characters and their most notable traits
  • plot elements (setting, conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion)
  • two major themes
  • point of view of the work and how it makes a difference
  • stylistic devices (symbol, allusion, figures of speech, diction, syntax, etc.)
  • a profound quotation or two
  • two connections to Foster's HTRLLP
4/18
Multiple Choice practice--British Poetry

Tomorrow--bring your anthologies to class for poetry.

Homework for Wednesday--read Margaret Edson's Wit (pages 1-44). Finish the play for Thursday (45-85).
multiple choice packet
AP Review over major works of literature will be due Wednesday, 4/27. See me if you haven't signed up for a work of literature. Create a google doc, invite me (mwilcox4@gmail.com) and the other group members.
Please type your name next to the sections you complete so that I may give you credit.
In addition to the review, make sure you connect to at least two chapters in Foster's How to Read Literature Like a Professor.
In your review of major works, include the following:
  • author, genre of writing, time period written, title
  • major, minor characters and their most notable traits
  • plot elements (setting, conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion)
  • two major themes
  • point of view of the work and how it makes a difference
  • stylistic devices (symbol, allusion, figures of speech, diction, syntax, etc.)
  • a profound quotation or two
  • two connections to Foster's HTRLLP
4/15
Atonement Essay

British multiple choice practice due Monday.

Be thinking of which play you'd like to read next: A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen or Wit by Margaret Edson.
Atonement Essay
Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th).

Cliff's AP Literature and Composition
  • review literary terms

Be thinking of which play you'd like to read next: A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen or Wit by Margaret Edson. Read reviews and prepare to vote next week sometime.
4/14
Finish Atonement presentations in class. However, you're responsible for reviewing the characters. See your peers' character analysis below.

Atonement in-class essay tomorrow.

5th Hour Atonement
Atonement

7th Hour Atonement
Atonement-7th

British multiple choice practice due Monday.

Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th).

Cliff's AP Literature and Composition
  • review literary terms

Be thinking of which play you'd like to read next: A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen or Wit by Margaret Edson. Read reviews and prepare to vote next week sometime.
4/13
Early dismissal

We'll resume Atonement presentations on Thursday and write over the novel on Friday.

Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th).

Cliff's AP Literature and Composition
  • review literary terms
  • practice test 3 due Thursday, 4/14

Be thinking of which play you'd like to read next: A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen or Wit by Margaret Edson. Read reviews and prepare to vote next week sometime.
4/12
No JT

Atonement presentations

Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th).

Cliff's AP Literature and Composition
  • review literary terms
  • practice test 3 due Thursday, 4/14

Be thinking of which play you'd like to read next: A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen or Wit by Margaret Edson. Read reviews and prepare to vote next week sometime.
4/11
Passed back Hamlet essays.

Atonement presentations
Atonement presentations
Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th).

Cliff's AP Literature and Composition
  • review literary terms
  • practice test 3 due Thursday, 4/14

Be thinking of which play you'd like to read next: A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen or Wit by Margaret Edson. Read reviews and prepare to vote next week sometime.
4/8
Time in class to complete group presentations over Atonement. See yesterday's assignments below to click on the correct document. Due Monday at the beginning of the hour.

Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th).

Cliff's AP Literature and Composition
  • review literary terms
  • practice test 3 due Thursday, 4/14

Be thinking of which play you'd like to read next: A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen or Wit by Margaret Edson. Read reviews and prepare to vote next week sometime.
4/7
Begin group presentations over Atonement-
due Monday at the beginning of the hour.


5th Hour Atonement
Atonement

7th Hour Atonement
Atonement-7th

Literary Criticism over Atonement
Finney Essay

Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th).


Group presentations over Atonement-due Monday at the beginning of the hour.
4/6
RQ over Atonement

Large group discussion over novel.

Divide into small groups--directions for Google presentation over Atonement:
Small groups to analyze setting/plot, theme, style, point of view, literary allusions, and characters--due on Monday.
R.Q.
Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th). Finish reading Atonement by Wednesday, 4/6.
4/5
Motif analysis--R&G are Dead.
Begin presenting to the class.

Time in class to finish reading/review Atonement

Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th). Finish reading Atonement by Wednesday, 4/6.
4/4
JT--Compare R&G in Hamlet to their same characters in Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead. Can R&G exist as a play it is own right without an audience understanding Hamlet? Explain why or why not. How does Hamlet's role change in Stoppard's play? If you were to rank the characters in order in both plays, what would your character lists look like?

Small groups to transfer tracking of motif to large post-its. As you discuss, identify key themes in the play. Are these themes the same as in Shakespeare's Hamlet?

No new homework. Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th). Finish reading Atonement by Wednesday, 4/6.

No new homework. Please begin reviewing for AP Literature Exam in one month (Thursday, May 5th). Finish reading Atonement by Wednesday, 4/6.
3/31
No JT

Please tell me the motif you've decided to track.

Q & A over Act I of R&G Are Dead

Tomorrow, you will have some time in class to read/finish Act II.

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 2 due 4/1
  • Act 3 due 4/4

Atonement--moved back to Wednesday, 4/6/11
3/30
JT--create a character sketch of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. What are they doing? What is their purpose?

NPR story:
"Behind the Scenes: How Do YOu Get Into Amherst?"

Continue your journal topic by examining the absurdity of this particular admissions process to R&G's situation.

Act I R & G--today
Tonight: continue reading and select a motif to trace throughout the play.

Act II for Friday.
Finish the play by Monday.
Discuss and compare to Hamlet on Tuesday

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 2 due 4/1
  • Act 3 due 4/4

Atonement--moved back to Wednesday, 4/6/11
3/29
Hamlet in-class essay

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1
Hamlet in-class essay
Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Atonement--moved back to Monday, 4/4/11
3/28
Continue Hamlet SS--please see Friday's discussion notes for day 2.

Hamlet in-class essay tomorrow.

Hamlet essay moved to Tuesday, 3/29.

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Hamlet essay moved to Tuesday, 3/29.
Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Atonement--moved back to Monday, 4/4/11
3/25
Finish Act V discussion.

Hamlet SS Discussion
7th Hour Hamlet Discussion
5th Hour Hamlet Discussion
Hamlet SS Discussion ?
Socratic Seminar will take place on Friday and Monday. Hamlet essay moved to Tuesday, 3/29.

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Atonement--moved back to Monday, 4/4/11
3/24
JT--evaluate the play overall. Record any questions you still have over Act V or other scenes.

Act V--discussion questions: answer and present.

Hamlet--Socratic Seminar Question due Friday (please bring two copies: one to turn in and one to discuss).

Socratic Seminar will take place on Friday and Monday. Hamlet essay moved to Tuesday, 3/29.

Hamlet--Socratic Seminar Question due Friday (please bring two copies: one to turn in and one to discuss).

Socratic Seminar will take place on Friday and Monday. Hamlet essay moved to Tuesday, 3/29.

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Atonement--moved back to Monday, 4/4/11
3/23
Finish Act IV Language Analysis presentations

Watch clips from Hamlet, Act IV.7 and Act V.1

Be sure to critically read the rest of Act V and notice how the end plays out. Was there poetic justice in the characters' ends?

Act V due Thursday.

Hamlet--Socratic Seminar Question due Friday (please bring two copies: one to turn in and one to discuss).
Essay on Monday, 3/28.

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Atonement--moved back to Monday, 4/4/11
3/22
Q&A over Act IV

Language Analysis in small groups over specific sections of Act IV--see me if absent. Group discussion, present, and turn in.

Actively read Act V for Thursday.

Hamlet--Socratic Seminar Question due Friday (please bring two copies: one to turn in and one to discuss).
Essay on Monday, 3/28.
Act IV language analysis
Act V due Thursday.

Hamlet--Socratic Seminar Question due Friday (please bring two copies: one to turn in and one to discuss).
Essay on Monday, 3/28.

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Atonement--moved back to Monday, 4/4/11
3/21
JT--to refresh your memories after Spring Break, take five minutes to record as much can about Hamlet. Consider characters, plot, events, etc.

Finish Act III language analysis

Q&A over Act IV--watch Ophelia's interactions with King/Queen as she sings her songs.

Act IV--due tomorrow.

Act V due Thursday.

Hamlet--Socratic Seminar Question due Friday (please bring two copies: one to turn in and one to discuss).
Essay on Monday, 3/28.

Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead:
  • Act 1 due 3/30
  • Act 2 due 3/31
  • Act 3 due 4/1

Atonement--moved back to Monday, 4/4/11
3/10
Language Analysis--Act III

Discussion questions--if time

Hamlet--Act IV due Tuesday, 3/22 after Spring Break

Have a safe, relaxing Spring Break! Come back ready and refreshed to make a strong finish!

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)

Hamlet--Act IV due Tuesday, 3/22 after Spring Break

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (3 weeks from this time).
3/9
Hamlet-questions for analysis over Act III--please see me for the handout.
Act III analysis questions
Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)

Hamlet--Act IV due Tuesday, 3/22 after Spring Break

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (3 weeks from this time).
3/8
Q&A over Act III Hamlet

Watch clips from Kenneth Branagh version of Hamlet.

Hamlet--Act 3 due Wednesday, 3/9

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)

Hamlet--Act IV due Tuesday, 3/22 after Spring Break

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (3 weeks from this time).
3/7
Pass back papers.

Language analysis Hamlet's soliloquy in Act 2, scene 2 (see me if absent)
  • paraphrase
  • identify tone and shifts
  • analyze imagery, catalog of detail, and rhetorical questions

Hamlet--Act 3 due Wednesday, 3/9

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)

Hamlet--Act 3 due Wednesday, 3/9

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (3 weeks from this time).
3/4
Language Analysis--puns and double entendres in Act 2.

Watch clip from Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet--player's speech recounting the tale of the Aeneid.

Homework
Hamlet--Act 3 due Wednesday, 3/9

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)

Hamlet--Act 3 due Wednesday, 3/9

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (4 weeks from this time).
3/3
Small group activity:
act out the conversation between Ophelia and her father as she recounts Hamlet's recent actions.

JT--Consider Polonius as a character after his conversation with Reynaldo. Also, consider Polonius' language when conducting his report to Gertrude and Claudius about Hamlet's recent actions. What motivates Polonius to act as he does? What insights can you surmise about his character?

Read aloud or watch Act 2.

Homework--finish reading Act 2 for Friday.

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)

Hamlet--Act 3 due Wednesday, 3/9

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (4 weeks from this time).
3/2
JT--many critics argue we can infer the themes of a Shakespearean play by the first few lines. If so, what are some of the prominent themes developing so far?

Finish language analysis of Act 1.
Watch Hamlet's 1st Soliloquy and discuss #8.

Homework--finish Act 2 by Friday.

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)

Hamlet--Act 3 due Wednesday, 3/9

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (4 weeks from this time).
3/1
Finally, the Ides of March!

JT--we witness both Laertes and Polonius giving advice to Ophelia. What is the essence of their advice? Are they bossy and overbearing or do they have Ophelia's best interests at heart? Explain.

Language Analysis--small groups. Remember, the key to unlocking meaning to Shakepseare's language:
  • paraphrasing the connotation/denotation of words
  • syntax--exploring the order of the words
  • figurative language
  • double meanings (puns, double entendres).

Homework--by Friday, have all of Act II completed.

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)


Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (4 weeks from this time).
2/28
JT--select one of the characters you've met thus far in Act I. What can we tell about him based on his actions & reactions from the other characters?
  • Barnardo
  • Marcellus
  • Horatio
  • King Hamlet (the ghost)
  • Claudius
  • Polonius
  • Laertes
  • Gertrude
  • Prince Hamlet

Record any questions you have from the first two scenes.

Watch and compare two clips from two different versions of the play. What decisions did the directors make in interpreting the same text? Which was more/less effective? Why?

Homework--finish Act I for tomorrow (read Act I, scenes 3, 4, & 5).
Actively stay engaged with the text by annotating. Pay special attention to connotation of words, syntax, figures of speech, and word play. When Hamlet speaks asides and soliloquies, we're privy to his inner thinking (something he may not convey in his actions & dialogue).

Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)


Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (4 weeks from this time).
2/25
JT--select two insights of Nabakov's that you found to be interesting, insightful, or far-fetched.

Present interior monologues

Finish "Metamorphosis" discussions--part 3 and rest of novella.

Homework: Hamlet
See long-term column (but this is due Monday, 2/28).
interior monologues
Homework: Hamlet
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)
Hamlet- please read the following:
  • "Shakespeare's Hamlet" (xiii-xiv)
  • "Reading Shakespeare's Language" (xiv-xxiii)
  • Hamlet Act 1, scenes i & ii (7-39)
Remember although it looks like a lot of reading, the play only appears on the right side of the text, the left page consists of explanatory notes.
It's OK if you don't understand every word but try to acquire a sense of mood captured in the first few scenes of the play. Where does it begin? What time of day/night is it? Which characters are involved and what are they doing? What is the history between Denmark and Norway as explained by Horatio?

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (5 weeks from this time).
2/24
Thursday in class: small assigned groups will select a scene from "Metamorphosis" to write an interior monologue (examine the scene from your character's first person point of view).
  • portray yourself as a character from the novella who is watching the scene unfold before your eyes (1st person point of view)
  • remember your physical attributes, your desires, motivations, personality, and other characteristics to convey a realistic depiction from this perspective
  • narrate what is happening to the audience
  • give us clues about the setting
  • use your voice to show emotion and reaction to the scene
  • discuss how these events affected you and the characters in the novella
If you're absent for any reason, please complete the interior monologue on your own

If time, we'll use the Ipads to look up various "isms" associated with "Metamorphosis" and/or read Nabokov's Lecture.

Also, read Nabakov's lecture over Kafka's Metamorphosis for Friday.

WDYCW?
& interior monologues (group work)
Folger Shakespeare Library Edition (ISBN 7344-8278-6)
Hamlet- please read the following:
  • "Shakespeare's Hamlet" (xiii-xiv)
  • "Reading Shakespeare's Language" (xiv-xxiii)
  • Hamlet Act 1, scenes i & ii (7-39)
Remember although it looks like a lot of reading, the play only appears on the right side of the text, the left page consists of explanatory notes.
It's OK if you don't understand every word but try to acquire a sense of mood captured in the first few scenes of the play. Where does it begin? What time of day/night is it? Which characters are involved and what are they doing? What is the history between Denmark and Norway as explained by Horatio?


Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (5 weeks from this time).
2/23
"Metamorphosis" discussion over sections 1 & 2.


Homework:
WDYCW?--complete for Thursday, 1-1.5 pages, typed, TNR font.

Also, read Nabakov's lecture over Kafka's Metamorphosis for Friday.

present assigned discussion question
Thursday in class: small assigned groups will select a scene from "Metamorphosis" to write an interior monologue (examine the scene from your character's first person point of view).
  • portray yourself as a character from the novella who is watching the scene unfold before your eyes (1st person point of view)
  • remember your physical attributes, your desires, motivations, personality, and other characteristics to convey a realistic depiction from this perspective
  • narrate what is happening to the audience
  • give us clues about the setting
  • use your voice to show emotion and reaction to the scene
  • discuss how these events affected you and the characters in the novella

If time, we'll use the Ipads to look up various "isms" associated with "Metamorphosis" and/or read Nabokov's Lecture.

For Monday, read Shakespeare's Hamlet, Act I, scenes i, ii, and iii. Your edition should be the Folger Skakespeare edition. It's OK if you don't understand every word but try to acquire a sense of mood captured in the first few scenes of the play. Where does it begin? What time of day/night is it? Who's involved and what are they

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (5 weeks from this time).
2/22
JT--Obviously, people do not awaken as Gregor does,"[finding] himself changed in his bed into a monstrous vermin" (1).
However, can you think of present-day examples when adult children may find themselves alienated from family/society after a sudden physical, personality, or other change?
Explain.

Anne Sexton's "Cockroach"

Metamorphosis small group discussion--questions for analysis (we'll present tomorrow). Whatever you don't finish will be homework.

Homework:
WDYCW?--complete for Thursday, 1-1.5 pages, typed, TNR font.

Also, read Nabakov's lecture over Kafka's Metamorphosis for Friday.


Homework:
WDYCW?--complete for Thursday, 1-1.5 pages, typed, TNR font.

Also, read Nabakov's lecture over Kafka's "Metamorphosis" for Friday.



Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (5 weeks from this time).
2/18
Recall all you can about what makes a poem a poem.

"Death of the Ball Turret Gunner" 977

"My Last Duchess" 768

Read Metamorphosis for Tuesday, 2/22/11

Metamorphosis--read Kafka's novella by Tuesday, 2/22/11

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (6 weeks from today).
2/17
Beloved in-class essay
Beloved essay
Metamorphosis--read Kafka's novella by Tuesday, 2/22/11

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (6 weeks from today).
2/16
Please click on yesterday's link to see a continuation of today's discussion.

Make sure you bring anthologies to class on Friday.
Reader Responses over Beloved turned in today.
Beloved
  • Beloved in-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17. For this essay, I'll let you use your novels.
  • Bring your anthology to class on Friday for Poetry Friday.

Metamorphosis--read Kafka's novella by Tuesday, 2/22/11

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (6 weeks from today).
2/15
Beloved SS Discussion
5th Hour Beloved
7th Hour Beloved

Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses (condense, answer questions you have asked, revise, add additional insight, and make sure to identify your writing). Final draft of Beloved Reader Response will be due Wednesday, 2/16.

Rubric for RR:

SS question
Beloved
  • SS discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses (condense, answer questions you have asked, revise, add additional insight, and make sure to identify your writing). Final draft of Beloved Reader Response will be due Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Beloved in-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17. For this essay, I'll let you use your novels.
  • Bring your anthology to class on Friday for Poetry Friday.

Metamorphosis--read Kafka's novella by Tuesday, 2/22/11

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (6 weeks from today).
2/14
Welcome back and Happy Valentine's Day!

Beloved--symbol/motif presentations.
Consider the motif you and your partner tracked throughout the novel Beloved. Please take 10 minutes to answer & present the following prompt:
"A symbol is an object, action, or event that represents something or that crates a range of associations beyond itself. In liteary works a symbol can express an idea, clarify meaning, or enlarge literal meaning. Using Beloved, focus on one symbol/motif, and present your ideas analyzing how that symbol/motif functions in the work and what it reveals about characters or themes of the work as a whole.

Socratic Seminar discussion question due tomorrow at the beginning of class. SS discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.

Beloved
  • Socratic Seminar discussion question due tomorrow at the beginning of class. SS discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses (condense, answer questions you have asked, revise, add additional insight, and make sure to identify your writing). Final draft of Beloved Reader Response will be due Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Beloved in-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17. For this essay, I'll let you use your novels.
  • Bring your anthology to class on Friday for Poetry Friday.

Metamorphosis--read Kafka's novella by Tuesday, 2/22/11

Atonement--please begin reading and finish Ian McEwan's Atonement for Monday, March 28th (6 weeks from today).
2/10
"The Sandbox" and multiple choice practice.
7th Hour (5th C week)--filming of "The Sandbox."
Homework--multiple choice practice.

Fences
5th Hour (6th C week)--possible motifs, discussion of fences (both literal and figurative meanings).
Read the play aloud in class.

Homework--read to page 1640 in anthology tonight (II.3) so that we may finish the play tomorrow in class.

Beloved
  • Motif presentations: Monday, 2/14.
  • Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses (condense, answer questions you have asked, revise, add additional insight, and make sure to identify your writing). Final draft of Beloved Reader Response will be due Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Socratic Seminar discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Beloved in-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17. For this essay, I'll let you use your novels.
2/9
7th Hour (5th C week)--your class voted to put on Edward Albee's "The Sandbox" and multiple choice practice. Please complete the packet by Friday. Bring any assigned props for the play tomorrow.

5th Hour (6th C week)--your class voted to read August Wilson's Fences.
Tonight for homework, read to page 1613 (Act I, Scene 2). As you read, consider the major motifs as they're introduced.

Beloved
  • Motif presentations: Monday, 2/14.
  • Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses (condense, answer questions you have asked, revise, add additional insight, and make sure to identify your writing). Final draft of Beloved Reader Response will be due Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Socratic Seminar discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Beloved in-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17. For this essay, I'll let you use your novels.
2/8
Beloved--part 3 questions
Partner #2--turn in RR over Part 3.
Beloved
  • Motif presentations: Monday, 2/14.
  • Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses (condense, answer questions you have asked, revise, add additional insight, and make sure to identify your writing). Final draft of Beloved Reader Response will be due Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Socratic Seminar discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Beloved in-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17. For this essay, I'll let you use your novels.
2/7
If you are going to be here this week, please vote and indicate what you'd like to do this week. Right now, the votes are tied between August Wilson's Fences and more multiple choice. Voting ends today at 5 PM.

Beloved
JT--evaluate the end of the novel.

Together, discuss the ending and your response. Create two higher-level thinking questions.
Click on the following google.doc and record your question(s). Remember to look over the questions, and not to repeat.
Beloved Part 3 Discussion Questions
Partner #2--your last reader response over Part 3.
Beloved
  • Motif presentations: Monday, 2/14.
  • Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses (condense, answer questions you have asked, revise, add additional insight, and make sure to identify your writing). Final draft of Beloved Reader Response will be due Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Socratic Seminar discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.
  • Beloved in-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17. For this essay, I'll let you use your novels.
*
If you will be here during the week of Kairos, please vote and indicate what you'd like to do.
Vote Here, please.


2/3
What a week! Welcome back.

Journal Topic--"124 was loud" begins Part Two of Beloved. Read aloud what Stamp Paid thinks, "the thoughts of the women of 124, unspeakable thoughts, unspoken" (235).
Record your observations and questions over some segment/fragment.

Today--exchange Part Two reading logs (RR #1) with your partner. No, girls, I'm not an ogre and so sorry I didn't update the website. I should have let you know not to finish the novel by today.
Part 3 is not due today; we have to discuss the very complex interior monologues of Part 2 before we proceed further.
Like you've done before, consider one to two higher-level thinking questions. Click on the following google.doc and record your question(s). Remember to look over the questions, and not to repeat.
Beloved Part II Discussion Questions

Homework--look over the interior monologues again and try to make some sense of the confusion. Consider the style of the monologues.
Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due Thursday, 2/3(RR #1)
Beloved Reading Schedule:
Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/7 (RR #2)

Beloved

  • Motif presentations: Monday, 2/14.
  • Reader Response partners: please clean up and polish your responses. More information to come soon.
  • Socratic Seminar discussion will occur on Tuesday, 2/15 & Wednesday, 2/16.
  • In-class essay will take place on Thursday, 2/17.
1/31
Finish POV style analysis presentations--take notes.

Pass out your questions over the rest of Part I Beloved and discuss.
POV style analysis
Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due Tuesday, 2/1(RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/28
Two minutes to gather with your small groups to discuss style analysis before you present your findings.

Homework--I've moved Part Two (1st reader's response) back to Tuesday. The rest of the reading schedule will stay the same.

Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due Tuesday, 2/1(RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/27
Respond to a passage from this past week's reading: something difficult, dense, or beautifully written.

Partner #2, give your entry over the rest of part I to your partner. Read and discuss. Consider 1 to 2 higher level thinking questions. Select someone to type them on the attached google.doc. Carefully read and make sure you don't repeat questions. Also, add both of your names at the end of the question(s).

Beloved, The rest of Part I

Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due 1/31 (RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
2nd partner's entry over the rest of part I.
Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due Tuesday, 2/1(RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/26
Beloved
Continue discussing part I questions. In preparation for today's discussion, all of you should answer #6. An overview:
Who is Beloved? Consider Beloved's physical characteristics, her mannerisms, her wants, desires, and motivations.
What was she as a spiritual entity? How did she act, make her presence known?
What does she represent symbolically?


Finish discussion.

If time, you may read the remainder of class. Partner #2, your response over the rest of Part One is due tomorrow (9-18). Make sure to keep your partner's original observations in mind as you respond to this section. Also, consider the motif the two of you have selected.

Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • The rest of Part One (9-18) to page 195 due Thursday, 1/27 (RR#2)
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due 2/1 (RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/25
5-10 minutes to confer with another about your selected motif. As you read the rest of part I, keep this motif in mind for your response journal.

Q&A over Beloved

2nd partner's RR due Thursday. Keep your partner's response (#1) and the new reading in mind as you respond to the rest of part I.
assigned part I questions
Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • The rest of Part One (9-18) to page 195 due Thursday, 1/27 (RR#2)
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due 1/31 (RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/24
In your reader-response small groups, brainstorm the characters from Beloved you've met thus far. Jot down character traits and any motifs associated with that character (even the most subtle clues). Write these down on the whiteboard after you've finished brainstorming.

Now, with your partner select a character/motif & begin tracking. Find evidence and page numbers in the novel and write down.

Beloved--Part 1 questions from last Friday. You'll be assigned one to answer for tomorrow's class.


Beloved discussion--Q&A

Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • The rest of Part One (9-18) to page 195 due Thursday, 1/27 (RR#2)
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due 1/31 (RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/21
JT--respond to a part of Beloved that you thought was beautifully written or one that you immediately grasped and understood. Find the partial passage and respond.

Meet with your response partners and discuss entry for pages 24-100. Was there a particular motif you focused on? Explain and discuss. As you discuss, create two higher- level thinking questions and turn in with both your names.
Check reading log for partner #1 over log entry #1.

Two higher-level thinking questions over Part I of Beloved.
Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • The rest of Part One (9-18) to page 195 due 1/27 (RR#2)
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due 1/31 (RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/19
Q & A over Beloved

Finish reading chapter 1 aloud.

Reader Response partners and handout. Read to 100 by Friday. 1st partner's reader response due that day.

Beloved Reading Schedule:
  • Part One (2-8) to page 100 due Friday, 1/21(RR #1)
  • The rest of Part One (9-18) to page 195 due 1/27 (RR#2)
  • Part Two (19-25) 199-277 due 1/31 (RR #1)
  • Part Three (26-28) 281-324 due 2/3 (RR #2)
1/18
JT--how have you grown as a critical reader? Or what did you think of Beloved after reading the first chapter?

Beloved
Observe the dedication, the epigraph, the drawings in the novel. Why did Morrison choose not to number the chapters or give each chapter a title?

Read the first chapter of Beloved together. Reflect and discuss as we read.

No new homework but you may re-read what we've already read. Record additional questions as they arise.
2nd Time Around/
Independent
Read
Poetry on hold until we finish reading Beloved
1/12
I hope you enjoyed the snow days and had plenty of time to work on your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading Project. If you finish by 1/13, please turn in. If not the final due date is 1/18.

Multiple Choice Analysis in class.

For tomorrow, read chapter 12 "Rhythm and Meter," and prepare the exercise #1 on pages 849 & 850. Figure out which category each poem belongs:
  • "Birches" 963
  • "Break of Day" 664
  • "Thistle" 832"
  • "Mirror" 669
  • "Ulysses" 745
  • "Dover Beach" 813
  • "The Unknown Citizen" 767
  • "The Second Coming" 1018
  • "Out, Out--" 773
  • "Siren Song" 780

2nd Time Around/Independent Read--due 1/18/11 (extra credit for those who turn it in on 1/13/11 (original date).

Beloved begins 1/18/11

Independent Read/2nd Time Around
1/6
&
1/7
Multiple Choice--group analysis

2nd Time Around/Independent Read--due 1/18/11 (extra credit for those who turn it in on 1/13/11 (original date).

Beloved begins 1/18/11

Independent Read/2nd Time Around


2nd Time Around/Independent Read--due 1/18/11 (extra credit for those who turn it in on 1/13/11 (original date).

Beloved begins 1/18/11

Independent Read/2nd Time Around

1/4
Information about Poetry Out Loud--you don't have to memorize a poem this year; however, if you'd like the opportunity to participate please see me.

School-wide competition will be the week of 1/18/11 (date to be determined).
See me for details.

5th Hour Poetry Presentations:
  • Atwood
  • Bishop
  • Boland
  • Brooks
  • Collins

Homework--carefully read chapter 11 "Musical Devices" and define the following:
  • assonance
  • consonance
  • alliteration
  • rhyme
  • slant rhyme/approximate rhyme

Now that you're well rested, we'll finish poetry (for the most part).

2nd Time Around/Independent Read--due 1/18/11 (extra credit for those who turn it in on 1/13/11 (original date).

Beloved begins 1/18/11

Independent Read/2nd Time Around

1/3
Carefully look at "When I Have Fears" and "Mezzo Cammin"

Breakdown of multiple choice.

Pass back poetry papers.

Homework--review "Musical Devices" chapter 11 & review your poem for poetry presentation. We'll present this week.
  • most interesting biographical points
  • read your poem aloud, paying careful attention to pauses, stops, enjambments, etc
  • analysis of your poem





Now that you're well rested, we'll finish poetry (for the most part).

2nd Time Around/Independent Read--due 1/18/11 (extra credit for those who turn it in on 1/13/11 (original date).

Beloved begins 1/18/11

Independent Read/2nd Time Around

12/15
Hi Girls.

I just finished grading the AP Poetry Papers & overall they were phenomenal. Excellent job!

When we return, I'm going to ask everyone to present a poem by your author and give some background biographical and stylistic information.

Attached are the poems I'd like you to present. If you'd rather do another, let me know.




Have a great break (all of you deserve it).

Come back ready to finish strong.

Independent Read/2nd Time Around

12/10
All finished with the AP Literature Exam, congratulations!

Over break, please read the sound devices chapters in the Perrine anthology:
  • Chapter 11 "Musical Devices"
  • Chapter 12 "Rhythm and Meter"
  • Chapter 13 "Sound and Meaning"

We'll spend another week on poetry when you return and then we'll cover a poem/week for the rest of the semester.

Independent Read/2nd Time Around


This paper will be due 1/13/11 so plan accordingly.
12/7
6th hour--"To Autumn" multiple choice practice
"My mistress' eyes..."
"The Flea"

7th hour--"To His Coy Mistress," "My mistress eyes.." and "The Flea"

Email me your paper by tomorrow if you haven't done so yet.

Final Exam on Friday--get pick up packet of literary terms if absent.
12/6
Evaluate your poetry paper--what did you do well, what are you still unsure of, what do you want to continue learning about poetry before the AP exam in May.

Remember to email me an electronic copy of your poetry paper by Wednesday.

7th hour (6th B)--"Digging," "To His Coy Mistress," "To the Virgins, to make much of Time"

5th Hour (7th B)--"To Autumn" multiple choice practice and "To the Virgins"
AP Poetry Society Paper
Final Exam on Friday--get pick up packet of literary terms if absent.




12/2
Finish John Donne's "A Valediction Forbidding Mourning"

Practice prompt--10 minutes

Read your TO PASS IT+figurative language and discuss.

Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3
Also, read "Tone" chapter 10 (but only read 800-806).
Figurative language analysis
Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.



Studying for the Final Exam:
The final exam will consist of a full-length multiple choice section and one poetry essay.

  • Review literary terms Cliff's AP Literature and Composition (83-92) and in your anthology.
  • Read "The AP Literature Exam Section 1: Multiple-Choice Questions" 23-47
  • Take a full-length multiple choice practice test. Multiple choice for test one, pages 107-120.
12/1
Watch a four minute clip from "Bright Star" (John Keats discussing poetry).

JT--what are some common objects/items a poet or song writer might compare love to?
What about a compass? How might a drafting compass be similar to love? Take one and jot down ideas.

"A Valediction Forbidding Mourning"--read aloud together. Read again quietly. Write a brief synopsis of the poem--title, occasion, purpose, audience, speaker, subject, imagery, tone (and diction).

Divide into four groups and take a closer look at poem.
Present your groups' findings to the class.
Bring figurative language poems to class on Thursday, so I can check.
Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3
Also, read "Tone" chapter 10 (but only read 800-806).

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.



Studying for the Final Exam:
The final exam will consist of a full-length multiple choice section and one poetry essay.

  • Review literary terms Cliff's AP Literature and Composition (83-92) and in your anthology.
  • Read "The AP Literature Exam Section 1: Multiple-Choice Questions" 23-47
  • Take a full-length multiple choice practice test. Multiple choice for test one, pages 107-120.
11/30
"Bright Star"

literary terms--apostrophe, synecdoche, metonymy, conceit

"Mind"

Homework--read chapter six "Figurative Language 2" and complete your assigned TO PASS IT+figurative language or answer the provided questions.
Also, bring a compass for tomorrow's class.

Chapter Six, "Figurative Language 2" for Wednesday, 12/1

Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.


11/29
JT--What does it mean to "dream big? Is this good advice? Explain. Is there a dream you have for your generation? What do you and most of your peers want to achieve in your lifetime?
What factors play a role in achieving or not achieving a person's goals?

Watch Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" Speech.

Assign small groups a line/unit from L. Hughes "Harlem" and discuss/answer questions on the board. Do a dramatic reading of the poem considering the tone your group decides to take.

Homework--figurative language poem sign-up sheet. Please select a poem and do a TO PASS IT+figurative language or answer the questions at the end.
"Bright Star" and "Mind" due Tuesday, the rest may be turned in Wednesday.

Read "Figurative Language 2" for Wednesday.

Chapter Six, "Figurative Language 2" for Wednesday, 12/1

Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.


11/23
"Those Winter Sundays"
"Metaphors"
"It sifts like leaden sieves"
"The Author to Her Book"

Have a great break, girls. The only homework is to work on your poetry papers.

Anthology chapters for the next couple of weeks:

Chapter Six, "Figurative Language 2" for Wednesday, 12/1

Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.

11/22
"C"
JT--listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons" as you journal about fall. What reminds you of fall, what do you hear in the musical piece? Free write as you listen.

Definition of apostrophe--see anthology.

Read "To Autumn" by John Keats
  • imagery
  • apostrophe
  • mood
  • shifts

AP practice prompt

Homework--read chapter five "Figurative Langauge 1" for tomorrow.

Anthology chapters for the next couple of weeks:

Chapter Six, "Figurative Language 2" for Wednesday, 12/1

Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.

11/18
Continue "Ars Poetica"

Close reading and analysis of Frost's
"Desert Places"

"The Owl" by Edward Thomas as featured in the excellent article by Billy Collins in Lapham's Quarterly.
"The Vehicle of Language"

Continue analysis of imagery
7th hour: "I Felt a Funeral in my Brain" &
"Widow's Lament in Springtime"
5th hour: "Man with Night Sweats" & "I Felt a Funeral in my Brain"

No new homework--please work on Contemporary Poetry Society project or read independent reading work.

Anthology chapters for the next couple of weeks:

Chapter Six, "Figurative Language 2" for Wednesday, 12/1

Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.

11/17
Finish "One Art"

Practice prompt over "One Art"

JT--Go back to a memorable childhood scene. Describe the vivid detail you recall. Recreate the sensory imagery: sights, sounds, smells, tastes, etc. Try to recreate the moment so that we can understand your memory better.

Imagery and importance of sensory details as they create meaning/effect. Examine poems preceding this chapter:
  • "Terence, this is stupid stuff" 649
  • "Ars Poetica" 652
  • "Mirror" 669
  • "Storm Warnings" 672
  • "Pathedy of Manners" 678
  • "Naming of Parts" 680
  • "Desert Places" 683

Homework: sign up for an "Imagery" poem.
Read, re-read it and answer a "TO PASS IT" or the assigned questions at the end of the poem.
Whichever you decide to do, make sure you address how the language evokes a concrete sensory impression and explain the effect that imagery has on emotion and meaning (the total effect of the poetic experience).

Anthology chapters for the next couple of weeks:

Chapter Five "Figurative Language 1" for Monday, 11/22

Chapter Six, "Figurative Language 2" for Wednesday, 12/1

Chapter Seven, "Figurative Language 3" for Friday, 12/3

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.

11/16
Voice Lessons--a couple of examples from diction.

Discuss exercises.

Read two poems, "The World is Too Much With Us" on page 682 and "One Art" on page 686.
Divide class into small groups to fully explore the poems.
Come back together as a class and discuss significance.

If you were absent today for the Prayer and Worship field-trip, please see the attached document and turn in Wednesday.


For Wednesday, read "Imagery" chapter 4 (689-703).

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details. Paper and presentations will begin Monday, 12/6.

11/15
"B"
Journal Topic
Re-read Sylvia Plath's "The Mirror" and answer the following:

  • who is the speaker?
  • what is the difference between the two stanzas in terms of form, style, and content?
  • any questions you have over the poem
Close reading of Adrienne Rich "Storm Warnings"

Present your assigned TO PASS IT poems in small groups to one another. Discuss interpretations of the following:

  • title
  • occasion
  • purpose
  • audience
  • speaker
  • subject
  • imagery
  • tone
Homework: select three of the exercises on page 679 & 680. Complete for tomorrow.
check "To Pass It" over your assigned poem
For Wednesday, read "Imagery" chapter 4 (689-703).

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details.


"The Vehicle of Language
Please read for Friday if you haven't done so already.
11/12
Today's Poems:
  • finish "Porphyria's Lover"
  • "A Study of Reading Habits"
  • "Mirror"--look at Picasso's painting "Girl Before a Mirror"
  • "Storm Warnings"

To Pass IT--sign up for your poem. Due Monday.

For Monday, read chapter three "Denotation and Connotation" carefully.

Attached is a phenomenal essay about poetry by none other than Billy Collins. Please read by Monday.

"The Vehicle of Language"
Sign up for 2nd Time Around,
Independent
Read.
Friday--sign up for your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading work

  • a work of fiction
  • a work of literary merit
  • must be over 150 pages in length
  • if it's not something you read at Sion before, it must come from the AP list of titles or it must be an award-winning work (Nobel Prize, Pulitzer, Booker Man Prize, National Book Award Winner)

Contemporary AP Poetry Society Presentation & Paper--see the attached link for specific assignment details.


Before you being your research and analysis, see the master list below. Email me with your choice, and I'll update periodically.

11/11
"Introduction to Poetry" Billy Collins
"You Begin" Margaret Atwood

"Dulce et Decorum Est"

TO PASS IT
  • Title
  • Occasion
  • Purpose
  • Audience
  • Speaker
  • Subject
  • Imagery
  • Tone

"Is My Team Plowing" Housman
"When in Rome" Evans
"Porphyria's Lover" Browning
"Dulce et Decorum Est"
response and thesis
For Monday, read chapter three "Denotation and Connotation" carefully.
Please begin recording important literary terms and examples as they occur.

"TO PASS IT"
w/assigned poem--please listen for details.

Friday--sign up for your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading work
  • a work of fiction
  • a work of literary merit
  • must be over 150 pages in length
  • if it's not something you read at Sion before, it must come from the AP list of titles or it must be an award-winning work (Nobel Prize, Pulitzer, Booker Man Prize, National Book Award Winner)


Make your choice and have it ready to go by Friday. If you begin reading and do not like it, you may change your mind up until 11/30.
11/10
NPR story about a three year old reciting "Litany" by Billy Collins. Recitation from both the little boy and the poet.

A few minutes to share your favorite childhood poems.

JT--What does poetry mean to you? Did you enjoy it as a child? What were your favorite poems, nursery rhymes, why? What does poetry mean to you now? What do you hope to ascertain as we begin our study of poetry? Explain.

Look at definitions of poetry by famous poets.
Respond.

Read "Ballad of Birmingham" and newspaper story about that same event.

"Dulce et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen & handout with homework due tomorrow. Please see me for handout.
7th hour--turn in yesterday's homework.
Please begin your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading Novel very soon. Begin looking for a book to read/re-read this weekend. Make sure it meets the following criteria:
  • a work of fiction
  • a work of literary merit
  • must be over 150 pages in length
  • if it's not something you read at Sion before, it must come from the AP list of titles or it must be an award-winning work (Nobel Prize, Pulitzer, Booker Man Prize, National Book Award Winner)


Make your choice and have it ready to go by Friday. If you begin reading and do not like it, you may change your mind up until 11/30.
11/9
No JT

Working independently, select one of the assigned poems and complete the handout.

For Wednesday, carefully read chapter two, "Reading the Poem" pages 655-664. Also, find, print, and bring two of your favorite childhood poems to class tomorrow.
Monday's assignment.
Please begin your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading Novel very soon. Begin looking for a book to read/re-read this weekend. Make sure it meets the following criteria:
  • a work of fiction
  • a work of literary merit
  • must be over 150 pages in length
  • if it's not something you read at Sion before, it must come from the AP list of titles or it must be an award-winning work (Nobel Prize, Pulitzer, Booker Man Prize, National Book Award Winner)


More information and a sign-up sheet will be forthcoming.
11/4
Wuthering Heights Essay

Absent students: please see me about the make-up essay. Although we don't have class, stop by to see me Monday (Alexandra, Kelsey, Emily R--plan on writing Wed. 11/10 during lunch study hall).

Poetry will begin on Tuesday, 11/9. Please read "What is Poetry?" pages 633-653 in preparation for Tuesday's class.

To ease into poetry, find two of your favorite childhood poems & bring to class on Wednesday.

Please begin your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading Novel very soon. Begin looking for a book to read/re-read this weekend. Make sure it meets the following criteria:
  • a work of fiction
  • a work of literary merit
  • must be over 150 pages in length
  • if it's not something you read at Sion before, it must come from the AP list of titles or it must be an award-winning work (Nobel Prize, Pulitzer, Booker Man Prize, National Book Award Winner)


More information and a sign-up sheet will be forthcoming.
11/3
2nd Time Around/Independent Reading Titles--select your work and begin reading soon. If you don't like it, you have until 11/23 to change your title.

Finish Wuthering Heights--essay tomorrow.

Poetry will begin on Tuesday, 11/9. Please read "What is Poetry?" pages 633-653 in preparation for Tuesday's class.

Please begin your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading Novel very soon. Begin looking for a book to read/re-read this weekend. Make sure it meets the following criteria:
  • a work of fiction
  • a work of literary merit
  • must be over 150 pages in length
  • if it's not something you read at Sion before, it must come from the AP list of titles or it must be an award-winning work (Nobel Prize, Pulitzer, Booker Man Prize, National Book Award Winner)


More information and a sign-up sheet will be forthcoming.
11/2
A big apology to STUCO members--I forgot about the camp-out tomorrow night. So, if you'd like to write your WH essay during lunch study hall tomorrow, please see me in the AM or send me an email.

Wuthering Heights SS
5th Hour WH Socratic Seminar Discussion
7th Hour WH Socratic Seminar

Homework
Read the following link defining a
Byronic Hero
Think about and determine whether or not Heathcliff qualifies.

For most of the AP students, essay will be on Thursday but if you're on STUCO, see note to the left.

Poetry will begin on Tuesday, 11/9. Please read "What is Poetry?" pages 633-653 in preparation for Tuesday's class.

Please begin your 2nd Time Around/Independent Reading Novel very soon. Begin looking for a book to read/re-read this weekend. Make sure it meets the following criteria:
  • a work of fiction
  • a work of literary merit
  • must be over 150 pages in length
  • if it's not something you read at Sion before, it must come from the AP list of titles or it must be an award-winning work (Nobel Prize, Pulitzer, Booker Man Prize, National Book Award Winner)


More information and a sign-up sheet will be forthcoming.
11/1
Wuthering Heights Socratic Seminar today and tomorrow.

Some technical difficulty with the SS discussion notes from today. I will resolve the issue and post Tuesday.

Read the following link defining a
Byronic Hero

Think about and determine whether or not Heathcliff qualifies.
Socratic Seminar homework
Wuthering Heights--essay on Wednesday.

Poetry will begin on Tuesday, 11/9. Please read "What is Poetry?" pages 633-653 in preparation for Tuesday's class.
10/29
In honor of Halloween, watch a very scary Kate Bush video entitled "Wuthering Heights"

Discussion--supernatural and gothic elements in Wuthering Heights.

Homework--select a Socratic Seminar question posted below. You may select your own or a classmate's question. Please put your name (in different color next to the question). No more than two or three people/SS discussion question.
Do not answer the question on the google.doc. Type out your own response using your own insight, evidence from the text, evidence from the literary criticism (cite, please). Make sure you have a minimum of one typed page. Due Monday at the beginning of the hour.

Wuthering Heights
10/28
Pass out multiple-choice stems.

Create a group answer key for multiple-choice packets.

Homework
Using the multiple-choice stems, create four multiple-choice questions over your assigned Wuthering Heights chapter. Make sure you put your name and assigned chapter next to your questions.
5th Hour (A Week M.C.) WH Multiple Choice
7th Hour (A Week M.C.) WH Multiple Choice

On a separate google doc, create one higher-level thinking question for Monday's Socratic Seminar over Wuthering Heights (see long-term column for sample).
5th Hour (A Week M.C.)5th Hour Higher-Level ?
7th Hour (A Week M.C.)7th Hour Higher-Level ?

Wuthering Heights

A sample higher level thinking question from Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God:

What is the relationship of the voice of the narrator, who is not a character in the story, but in the third-person omniscient, to the voices of the characters, who speak primarily in a Southern, black dialect? Some of the descriptive passages in the novel (the opening passage about "ships at a distance" for example, use richly poetic langauge, which contrasts sharply with the humorous, earthy language of Hurston's character. What is the effect on the reader as the text switches between these different modes? Why might have Hurston chosen to tell the story in this way, when she easlily could have chosen to tell it all in "standard" English or all in dialect?
10/27
Small groups--create an answer key. You must use logic to defend an answer, and your group must come to an agreement on the correct answer. Record your group's logic.
literary criticism
Wuthering Heights
10/26
Multiple Choice packets-use the 40 minutes to answer as many as you can.
Turn in by the end of the hour.
Wed--literary criticism is due.

Wuthering Heights
10/25
Excerpt from Secret Lives of Great Authors about the Bronte sisters.

Motif--consolidate and make inferences on large post-its

Homework for Wednesday--find, read, and print two scholarly pieces of literary criticism over your assigned Wuthering Heights topic.
I recommend going to Sion's Library Homepage, clicking on "databases" and looking at Bloom's Literary Reference &/or Proquest. If you have a library card & pin number with JC or KCMO libraries, you may access the databases from home.
checked 5 WH motif passages
Wuthering Heights
10/22
10 minute Q&A over Wuthering Heights

Check-for-reading quiz over Wuthering Heights

Homework--check the attached PDF if absent:


Madden #8 Caroline #1
Sarah K #10 Avery #6
Anna #7
Check-for-reading quiz.

Those who are absent may take it Monday after school.
Wuthering Heights
10/21
In-class essay over Q2

Wuthering Heights reading quiz tomorrow.
Q2 essay

10/20
Small group discussion and check theme statements for the following:
  1. subject and predicate
  2. generalization about life
  3. theme is not larger than justified in the story
  4. "central and unifying concept of a story" and should not be contradicted by details within the story
  5. avoids adages and cliches

Write theme statements on the board to prove that there is more than one way to state theme.

Assign small groups a random story from short story bootcamp. Create theme statements meeting the criteria.

Suggested homework--re-read two more of the following short stories in preparation for tomorrow's in-class essay.
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"

You will have a final in-class essay over one of the following short stories on Thursday.
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"


Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to Friday & that's the final move.
10/19
Where does the time go?

OK, girls. Look at sample Q2 prompt.
Finish "Where Are You Going, Where Have you Been?" & "A Worn Path"

Homework--create theme statements for "Once Upon a Time," "Eveline," or "Where....?" & another short story from the attached list.




Re-read at least two of the short stories tonight from the following:
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"

Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to Friday & that's the final move.

You will have a final in-class essay over one of the following short stories on Thursday.

  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"
10/18
"A"
Present the following short stories:
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"

Homework
Carefully read expository chapter "Theme" and be able to write theme statements for any of the short stories we've read.

Finish Wuthering Heights for 10/21

Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/22. Since I attended an AP conference yesterday, we'll finish theme on Monday & Tuesday. You will have a final in-class essay over one of the following short stories on Wednesday.

  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"
10/15
Divide class into three groups and finish the following stories:
  • Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"
If you are absent today, please answer the questions on page 230 in your anthology over "A Worn Path"
"Once Upon a Time" & "Where Have You Going, Where Have You Been?"
Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/21. Since I attended an AP conference yesterday, we'll finish theme on Monday & Tuesday. You will have a final in-class essay over one of the following short stories on Wednesday.

  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"
10/14
"Once Upon a Time"
&
"Where Are You, Where Have You Been?"

Remaining stories for Short Story Bootcamp:

  • "Eveline" for 10/15
  • "A Worn Path" 223-231 for 10/15
"Once Upon a Time" & "Where Have You Going, Where Have You Been?"
Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/21. Since I attended an AP conference yesterday, we'll finish theme on Monday & Tuesday. You will have a final in-class essay over one of the following short stories on Wednesday.

  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been"
  • "Once Upon a Time"
  • "Eveline"
  • "A Worn Path"
10/12
Q3 practice prompt over a symbol found in "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" or "Young Goodman Brown." Spend 10 minutes writing over prompt.

Rolling Stones "Sympathy with the Devil" and connections to Hawthorne's "Young Goodman Brown"

Discussion over "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" or "Young Goodman Brown."

Tonight's homework for Thursday:
  • Chapter Four "Theme" for 10/14
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" for 10/14
  • "Once Upon a Time" for 10/14

Remaining stories for Short Story Bootcamp:

  • "Eveline" for 10/15
  • "A Worn Path" 223-231 for 10/15


Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/18, not 10/11.
10/11
"C"
Journal Topic
1) What were your favorite fairy tales from childhood?
List a few and think about what common traits they share.
2) How important is fortune, or luck, in living a happy life? Are luck and fortune the same thing? How lucky are you? When you think of the word "luck" in isolation, do you think of good fortune and deep blessings such as family, health, and love, or do you think about being lucky at cards & games? Winning the lottery? How are the differences between these kinds of luck significant?

3) How do these differences create the main theme of the story? Identify the types of irony at the very beginning and ending of "Rocking Horse Winner."

  • fairy tale tone of short story--what is the usual format of a fairy tale?
  • close reading of first few paragraphs using different readers for narrator, everybody else, personified house, Paul, and Hester (Paul's mother).
  • discuss Paul's confusion between "luck" and "lucre"
  • identify three or four passages demonstrating the house's insatiable desire for more money
  • finally, analyze the tone, style, and figurative language of the story to create the moral message of the story

Tonight's homework--read
  • Young Goodman Brown" for 10/12
  • "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" for 10/12

Remaining stories for Short Story Bootcamp:

  • "Young Goodman Brown" for 10/12
  • "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" for 10/12
  • Chapter Four "Theme" for 10/14
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" for 10/14
  • "Once Upon a Time" for 10/14
  • "Eveline" for 10/15
  • "A Worn Path" 223-231 for 10/15

Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/18, not 10/11.
10/8
JT--If you could jump directly into the middle of a book you've read or a movie you've seen, what would it be? Why?

"The Kugelmass Epidose"
  • irony
  • metafiction
  • humor

Spend 10 minutes writing on a provided prompt. Listen carefully.
Introduction of essay over "The Kugelmass Episode"
For Monday, 10/11 read chapter 6 "Symbol, Allegory, and Fantasy" (284-295) & "The Rocking Horse Winner"

  • "Young Goodman Brown" for 10/12
  • "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" for 10/12
  • Chapter Four "Theme" for 10/14
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" for 10/14
  • "Once Upon a Time" for 10/14
  • "Eveline" for 10/15
  • "A Worn Path" 223-231 for 10/15

Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/18, not 10/11.
*
10/7
Finish Albert Camus' "The Guest," and discuss questions 4, 7, 8.

Flannery O'Connor--small group discussion over your selected O'Connor short story.
  • brief synopsis
  • main characters involved and their most distinctive traits
  • shifts in character (surprises)
  • humor
  • irony
  • ending

Before you read "The Kugelmass Episode" by Woody Allen, read the attached summary of Madame Bovary by Flaubert to familiarize yourself with the story.




For Monday, 10/11 read chapter 6 "Symbol, Allegory, and Fantasy" (284-295) & "The Rocking Horse Winner"

Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/18, not 10/11.
10/6
JT--Explore a particularly humorous passage from Frank O'Connor's "The Drunkard," and explain the comedic effect.

Discuss "The Drunkard"

In small groups of three, examine the main plot points of "The Guest," including the main characters, the conflict, and the resolution.
Answer questions 4, 7, & 8,

Discuss "The Guest"

For Thursday, read one of the four Flannery O'Connor short stories.
  • "Everything that Rises Must Converge," 434
  • "Greenleaf," 448
  • "Good Country People"


  • "Revelation"


For Friday, read "The Kugelmass Episode" by Woody Allen

10/5
"B"
Read the Q2 prompt from Maxine Clair's "Cherry Bomb" and write for 20 minutes.

Group evaluation of a sample essay. What is strong/weak about your sample essay?

Pass back your papers.

Homework for tomorrow, 10/6
  • "The Drunkard," 339
  • "The Guest," 356

For Thursday, read two of the four Flannery O'Connor short stories (you may select the two you read).
  • "Everything that Rises Must Converge," 434
  • "Greenleaf," 448
  • "Good Country People"


  • "Revelation"


For Friday, read "The Kugelmass Episode" by Woody Allen

10/1
JT--Evaluate "A Good Man is Hard to Find." Consider O'Connor's writing style, her use of diction, the character development, irony, humor and all the other aspects you've learned thus far.

Q&A over Wuthering Heights

No new homework (I can't believe I'm actually typing this).
Take a few hours this weekend to read Wuthering Heights or if you're going to absent next week, read at least two more short stories from the Humor and Irony section of Bootcamp).
Revised introductions.
Next Week (10/5-10/8) Short Story Bootcamp will include the following:
  • Humor and Irony, pages 334-338 (make sure you read this section for Friday).
  • "The Drunkard," 339
  • "The Guest," 356
  • "Everything that Rises Must Converge," 434
  • "Greenleaf," 448
  • "Good Country People" handout or online
  • "Revelation" handout or online
  • "The Kugelmass Episode" handout or online

For Monday, 10/11 read chapter 6 "Symbol, Allegory, and Fantasy" (284-295) & "The Rocking Horse Winner"
9/30
Writing Introductions--handout, revise your introduction over "Paul's Case" or "Hills" and turn in tomorrow (I'll need original and revised copy, please).

Discussion over a Writer's Style--compare "Araby" to "The Things They Carried"

Homework for Friday

  • read "Humor and Irony," pages 334-338
  • read Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" (page 420 in anthology)
Please bring Wuthering Heights to class with you tomorrow.

Bring Wuthering Heights to class Friday for a Q&A

Next Week (10/5-10/8) Short Story Bootcamp will include the following:

  • Humor and Irony, pages 334-338 (make sure you read this section for Friday).
  • "The Drunkard," 339
  • "The Guest," 356
  • "A Good Man Is Hard to Find," 420--for 10/1
  • "Everything that Rises Must Converge," 434
  • "Greenleaf," 448
  • "Good Country People" handout or online
  • "Revelation" handout or online
  • "The Kugelmass Episode" handout or online
9/29
Finish discussing "Hills Like White Elephants" and "Paul's Case"

Write an introduction to the provided prompt over either of the above stories.

Homework

  • write "Hills" or "Paul's Case" intro
  • read "The Things They Carried," the first chapter to the novel with the same title


Thursday: Lecture and handout--writing introductions. Revise yours for homework tonight (due Thursday).

"Araby" and a writer's style.

For Friday's Short Story Bootcamp, read Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" (page 420 in anthology)

Bring Wuthering Heights to class Friday for a Q&A

Next Week (10/5-10/8) Short Story Bootcamp will include the following:

  • Humor and Irony, pages 334-338 (make sure you read this section).
  • "The Drunkard," 339
  • "The Guest," 356
  • "A Good Man Is Hard to Find," 420
  • "Everything that Rises Must Converge," 434
  • "Greenleaf," 448
  • "Good Country People" handout or online
  • "Revelation" handout or online
  • "The Kugelmass Episode" handout or online


Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/18, not 10/11.
9/28
Short Story Bootcamp
  • "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall"
  • "Hills Like White Elephants"
  • finish "Paul's Case"

JT--What kind of woman is Ellen Weatherall? When the story begins, what are the circumstances of her situation? Why is stream of consciousness effective in this story?

Discuss "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall"

"Hills Like White Elephants"
Re-read "Hills Like White Elephants" as a short play & focus on the possible symbolism, importance of setting, economical dialogue,and actions.

Respond to the conflict between the two characters. What does each want? How do you know? What has their life been like up until now? Based on their actions, what will happen between the two. List all the possibilities and use supporting evidence to back your claims.

Homework tonight:
Read "Araby" on page 403

Bring The Things They Carried to class tomorrow.

Tomorrow (Wednesday, 9/29)
Finish discussing "Paul's Case" and "Hills Like White Elephants"

Practice Prompts

Lecture and handout--writing introductions. Revise practice prompt and finish for Thursday.

"Araby" and a writer's style

Homework for Thursday--revise introductory paragraph "Paul's Case"/"Hills" and read "The Things They Carried" (1st chapter in the novel). If you don't have the novel from English II H, it will be posted.

Bring Wuthering Heights to class Friday for a Q&A

Next Week (10/5-10/8) Short Story Bootcamp will include the following:

  • Humor and Irony, pages 334-338 (make sure you read this section).
  • "The Drunkard," 339
  • "The Guest," 356
  • "A Good Man Is Hard to Find," 420
  • "Everything that Rises Must Converge," 434
  • "Greenleaf," 448
  • "Good Country People" handout or online
  • "Revelation" handout or online
  • "The Kugelmass Episode" handout or online


Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/18, not 10/11.
9/27
"A" Week
JT--After finishing the story, what is your overall impression of Paul? Would he fit better in today's society than one in the early 1900's? Why?
How does "case" apply in this story? Consider the different denotative & connotative meanings. Find details from the story to support the various meanings of the word "case."

Analysis of various settings and impact on meaning.
5th & 7th hours--Tuesday, finish discussing "Paul's Case" (Cordelia Street & New York).

Homework for tomorrow:
  • "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall"
  • "Hills Like White Elephants"
Dialectical Journal over "Paul's Case"
For Wednesday, read "Araby" and you'll have some writing over Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants"

Please take note: the due date for completion of Wuthering Heights has changed to 10/18, not 10/11.


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/18)

9/24
As you complete your character's body biography, examine the point of view the author used to tell his/ her story. How would the short story have been different with another point of view? Explain.

Short Story Bootcamp
"The Lottery"
"The Cask of Amontillado"

Homework for Monday:
Carefully read Willa Cather's "Paul's Case" (244-261). As you read, examine Cather's use of shifting points of view in the first ten paragraphs (one entry). Respond in the form of a dialectical journal and discuss whether the details elicit our disapproval, sympathy, or both. Why?

After this first entry, you should complete at least six more entries in which you discuss Paul's characterization and his behavior at differnt points in the story, including:

  • Carnegie Hall
  • Cordelia Street
  • New York
So, read "Paul's Case" and complete a dialectical journal with at least 7 entries, one at school, two more for each place he travels.
Body Biographies over the short stories.
Short Story Bootcamp
For Tuesday, read

  • "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall"
  • "Hills Like White Elephants"


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/23
JT--what function does each character play within "The Third and Final Continent"?
Consider the narrator, Mrs. Croft, Mala, and Helen. How does the narrator change throughout the course of the story? What lesson does he learn?

Body Biographies--review over multiple stories:
  • "How I Met My Husband"
  • "Interpreter of Maladies"
  • "Story of an Hour"
  • "A Rose for Emily"
  • "A&P"
  • "Everyday Use"
  • "Miss Brill"
  • "The Man Who Was Almost a Man"
  • "The Third and Final Continent"
10 minutes tomorrow to finish

For Friday, read Chapter Five "Point of View" 237-243, "The Lottery" 261-268, "The Cask of Amontillado" 617-623.
Q2 Analysis over "Miss Brill" or "The Man Who Was Almost a Man"
For Monday--read "Paul's Case" & do some writing to go along with this story.

Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/22
JT--Select either "Miss Brill" or "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" and recall details about the main character's life. What sort of life do they live? How often does Miss Brill go to the park? How is her life different from the other elderly people around her?
How much power & autonomy does Dave have? How do you know?
Examine the character's conflict. How does it relate to meaning?

Discussion over both short stories in preparation for tonight's writing homework.

Tonight's Reading: "The Third and Final Continent" by Jhumpa Lahiri. It's not in your anthology, but I posted it online for you.


Tonight's Writing--select a Q2 prompt from either "Miss Brill" or "The Man Who was Almost a Man."
Complete out-of-class essay for tomorrow. Type or write neatly in pen (2 full pages).


Short Story Bootcamp
For Friday, read Chapter Five "Point of View" 237-243, "The Lottery" 261-268, "The Cask of Amontillado" 617-623.


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/21
Out of sheer laziness, I'm not retyping today's plans. See the PDF for specifics.



Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/20
No journal topic

"The Story of an Hour"
"A Rose for Emily"

Short Story Bootcamp
Read chapter three, "Characterization" (161-166).
Read "Everyday Use" (166-174)
Read "A&P" (624-629).
Your college essay

Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)


Reading for Wednesday:
"Miss Brill"
"The Man Who was Almost a Man"
9/17
Small group discussion

10-15 minutes AP practice prompt:
The full significance of the title "Interpreter of Maladies" discloses itself throughout the story. Examine the effectiveness of the title as it reflects such literary elements as point of view, narrative structure, and symbolism.

Homework

The College Essay
Your final draft of the college essay will be due Monday, 9/20. Of course you may turn in your final draft earlier, but that is the deadline. Please look over the revising, editing, and final rubric handouts and make the necessary changes.

For Monday
Read "A Story of an Hour" (524-526) & "A Rose for Emily" (526-534).
Response to Jhumpa Lahiri's "Inerpreter of Maladies"
The College Essay
Your final draft of the college essay will be due Monday, 9/20. Of course you may turn in your final draft earlier, but that is the deadline. Please look over the revising, editing, and final rubric handouts and make the necessary changes.

Short Story Bootcamp Selection


For Monday
Read "A Story of an Hour" (524-526) & "A Rose for Emily" (526-534).


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/16
"How I Met My Husband" Alice Munro
JT--respond to the surprise ending of "How I Met My Husband." What did you expect to happen? Why? Explain.

Discussion over analysis questions (page 141-42).

"Interpreter of Maladies"--consider the meaning of the title. What does an interpreter do? What are maladies?

Re-enact part of the story. Set the scene and role play. Pay particular attention where Mr. Kapasi is seated and whom he focuses on as he drives the Das family.

Finish the story for tonight's homework and select one of the journal topics for tomorrow's discussion (please type/write a 1-2 page response).

  • Discuss and evaluate the parenting styles (behavior and choices of Mr. & Mrs. Das).
  • What kind of relationship does Mr. Kapasi fantasize having with Mrs. Das? How does the interaction between these two characters create suspense? What changes Mr. Kapasi's thoughts?
  • Contrast the language, behavior, and social status of the Das family with that of Mr. Kapasi. What judgments do you make based on these contrasts?
  • Record precise detail of the characters' clothing. Makes insightful connections suggesting what these details suggest about character and how tension is created.
  • Look carefully at the suggested symbolism of the following:
    • camera & photographs
    • the mirror
    • the monkeys
    • tourist sites

The College Essay
Your final draft of the college essay will be due Monday, 9/20. Of course you may turn in your final draft earlier, but that is the deadline. Please look over the revising, editing, and final rubric handouts and make the necessary changes.

For Monday
Read "A Story of an Hour" (524-526) & "A Rose for Emily" (526-534).


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/15
JT--AP Exam Prep
Write a brief but detailed analysis of one character from Tobias Wolff's "Hunters in the Snow." Recall the important details and insights from yesterday's discussion. Remember to focus on the "so what?" How does this character's actions impact theme?

Examine Pieter Brueghel's painting "Hunters in the Snow" and make comparisions.

Finish discussion over which story has more literary merit: "Hunters in the Snow" or "The Most Dangerous Game"?

Graham Green's "The Destructors"--divide up the discussion questions and answer in small groups. Come back as a class and have a whole class discussion.

Short Story Bootcamp--for Thursday, 9/16
Alice Munro "How I Met My Husband"

The College Essay
Your final draft of the college essay will be due Monday, 9/20. Of course you may turn in your final draft earlier, but that is the deadline. Please look over the revising, editing, and final rubric handouts and make the necessary changes.

For Friday
Jhumpa Lahiri "Interpreter of Maladies"
Discussion questions over "Interpreter of Maladies"

For Monday
Read "A Story of an Hour" (524-526) & "A Rose for Emily" (526-534).


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/14
Short Story Bootcamp
JT--What do you enjoy reading in your spare time? What are some of your favorite books, guilty pleasures? Do some stories and novels go beyond being merely entertaining? What would make you want to read a story or novel more than once?

Commercial/Literary Fiction....

"The Most Dangerous Game"
"Hunters in the Snow"

Complete body biographies over the main characters in the two short stories. Consider the following:

  • physical traits
  • personality
  • actions
  • statements
  • choices
  • virtues/vices
In addition to completing these, define the inner and external conflicts within your assigned story. If you can, also determine the theme (s).

Based on the aformentioned criteria, which of the two stories has more literary merit? Debate in class.

Homework tonight:
Read Perrine Chapter Two "Plot and Structure" 103-111 &
Graham Greene "The Destructors"

The College Essay
Your final draft of the college essay will be due Monday, 9/20. Of course you may turn in your final draft earlier, but that is the deadline. Please look over the revising, editing, and final rubric handouts and make the necessary changes.


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)



Short Story Bootcamp--for Thursday, 9/16
Alice Munro "How I Met My Husband"
9/13
"B" Week
JT--what has helped you most with this college essay writing unit? Warm-ups, hearing former Sion essays? Revising/editing? Explain. Suggestions for improvement?

Last day to work as a class--constructive class criticism.

Final draft of the college essay due Monday, 9/20.

Reading for tomorrow's Short Story Bootcamp: Read chapter one "Reading the Story" in the Perrine anthology (61-102). There are two short stories within the chapter ("The Most Dangerous Game" and "Hunters in the Snow"). As you're reading, decide which has more literary merit and why.

You haven't had much time to put the college essay aside (draft #1 & #2). So, now you due. Put it away for a day or two, and come back to it with fresh perspective. Your final draft of the college essay will be due Monday, 9/20. Of course you may turn in your final draft earlier, but that is the deadline. Please look over the revising, editing, and final rubric handouts and make the necessary changes.


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/10
Listen to David Sedaris "A Shiner Like a Diamond"

Time in class to revise, edit, or work on the 2nd essay. This is a gift which won't be given often so use it wisely.

Monday--2nd college essay due. Same rules apply--type the prompt at the top, type, and bring to class Monday.
Finish reading On Writing The College Application Essay (82-90).
Check progress on the essay.
Final draft of college essay due Monday, 9/20 at the beginning of class.

Short Story Bootcamp begins Tuesday, 9/14. In preparation, please read chapter one "Reading the Story" in the Perrine anthology (61-102). There are two short stories within the chapter ("The Most Dangerous Game" and "Hunters in the Snow"). As you're reading, decide which has more literary merit and why.


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/9
For your 2nd college essay (due Monday), consider modeling a favorite writer's style.
Listen to Tim O'Brien's "Spin"and analyze syntax, detail, and message.

Revise, revise, revise. Use my provided handout with revision hints from Bauld's book, and taking a highlighter, tear apart your essay. This is where the grunt work truly begins, making your essay more vivid and engaging.

Tonight, read chapter 8 "Tinkering," 68-81. Take today's handout and complete the editing process.
Rough draft of first college essay.
Select another prompt and write another draft for Monday. If your 1st prompt was a safe topic, consider a riskier prompt/topic for the second.

Finish the rest of On Writing The College Application Essay for Monday (81-90).

Final draft of one of your College Essays due Wednesday, 9/15/10


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/8
Writing Warm-ups

  • Free Association, page 46-47
  • Grousing, page 46
  • Boring for Fun, 46-47
Additional Writing Warm-ups (Adapted from What If?)
  • List in detail all the places you have lived. Recount the details of specific rooms. Try to recall if you were happy or unhappy in those places.
  • List the top experiences of your life. The top 5, the top 10.
  • Create two or three characters from facets of your personality, put them in a car, and drive to Colorado. What would you discuss?
  • Consider your parents' relationship, from their point of view
  • How do your clothes define you--or not?
  • Have you ever prejudged someone incorrectly based on their appearance or has anyone ever judged you? Write about that time.
  • Do you have a recurring dream or nightmare?
  • Ask yourself, what did I care about when I was five, ten, fifteen, now? What will you care about in the future?
  • Did anyone ever give you advice that changed your life?
  • What are the forks in your road? Imagine the road not taken.
  • What is your five-year plan?

Listen to a few more Sionian college essays or "This
This I Believe"

College Essay rough draft due tomorrow. Please remember to type, double-space, and include the essay prompt at the top.

Read chapter 7 "Sweetheart, Get Me Rewrite!" 57-67 On Writing The College Application Essay for tomorrow.
Check the superlative list and the three expansion paragraphs.
Select one of the many essay prompts & write a rough draft for Thursday. Select from the google doc below or use your own essay prompt.

College Essay Prompts

Select another prompt and write another draft for Monday. If your 1st prompt was a safe topic, consider a riskier prompt/topic for the second.

Finish the rest of On Writing The College Application Essay for Monday (68-90).

Final draft of one of your College Essays due Wednesday, 9/15/10


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/7
JT--Define your audience, those who will be reading your college essay.
What's most important to remember?

Listen to David Sedaris "Picka Pocketoni"
Showing details, humor? How does Sedaris place us in the moment?

"This I Believe" Essays--these essays are perfect examples for the college essay. See the NPR archives for more samples. This I Believe
Tony Hawk
Jackie Lantry

Homework
Writing--Superlative hand-out. Please complete 1/3 of the superlatives and complete the paragraphs at the end. You may write out the superlatives, but please type the paragraphs (they don't have to be on separate pages).

On Writing the College Application Essay--read "Writing," 29-56.

Select one of the many essay prompts & write a rough draft for Thursday. Select from the google doc below or use your own essay prompt.

College Essay Prompts
9/3
Review my teacher recommendation form. If you want me to write your teacher rec, please print, fill out completely, and return Tuesday. I"ll begin taking forms Tuesday morning.


JT--Write down five things important or unique to you. After jotting them down, write them on the board.

Originality of your voice--this is everything!

Listen to a few college essays from former Sionians.

Homework: see long-term column but reading assignment is due on Tuesday, 9/7.

Find an interesting essay prompt, one you'd like to answer. Add to the google doc.
College Essay Prompts

On Writing the College Application Essay--please read the following:

  • Introduction

  • "Getting Ready" 3-26

  • "Reading" 93-100

  • "The Quick and the Dull" 100-122

Make sure this assignment is read by 9/7/10 (Tuesday)


Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)

9/2
Summer Reading In-class Essay

Summer Reading in-class essay will be on Thursday.

Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)


Please see The College Essay Box below--8/31

Find an interesting essay prompt, one you'd like to answer. Add to the google doc.
College Essay Prompts


On Writing the College Application Essay--please read the following:


  • Introduction

  • "Getting Ready" 3-26

  • "Reading" 93-100

  • "The Quick and the Dull" 100-122

Make sure this assignment is read by 9/7/10 (Tuesday)

Essay
Summer Reading in-class essay will be on Thursday.

Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)


Please see The College Essay Box below--8/31

Find an interesting essay prompt, one you'd like to answer. Add to the google doc.
College Essay Prompts


On Writing the College Application Essay--please read the following:


  • Introduction

  • "Getting Ready" 3-26

  • "Reading" 93-100

  • "The Quick and the Dull" 100-122

Make sure this assignment is read by 9/7/10 (Tuesday)

9/1
Continue Crime and Punishment SS

7th Hour C&P (continued)

5th Hour C&P (continued)

Homework--prepare for tomorrow's SR in-class essay. You may use either C&P or Lying Awake, depending on which book you use.

Summer Reading in-class essay will be on Thursday.

Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)


Please see The College Essay Box below--8/31 (sorry about the formatting).

Find an interesting essay prompt, one you'd like to answer. Add to the google doc.
College Essay Prompts


On Writing the College Application Essay--please read the following:


  • Introduction

  • "Getting Ready" 3-26

  • "Reading" 93-100

  • "The Quick and the Dull" 100-122

Make sure this assignment is read by 9/7/10 (Tuesday)

8/31
Socratic Seminar: Raskolnikov meets Dr. Phil

7th Hour C&P

5th Hour C&P

Soctratic Seminar Guidelines Rubric--this is a participation grade.


Take notes and participate as your character. Remember, the goal is to dig a bit further into the text to examine your own fresh, interpretations of character, setting, theme, etc.

Homework--essay over C&P or Lying Awake on Wed or Thursday. Please check again for details.

Summer Reading in-class essay will be on Thursday.

Independent Reading--Wuthering Heights (due 10/11)


Please see The College Essay Box below (sorry about the formatting).
The College Essay--find at least two interesting essay prompts you might answer. Please add them to this google doc link. Put your name, your hour, and the college next to the essay prompts & if you see it listed, find another. Complete this by 9/7/10.
College Essay Prompts


On Writing the College Application Essay--please read the following:

  • Introduction

  • "Getting Ready" 3-26

  • "Reading" 93-100

  • "The Quick and the Dull" 100-122

Make sure this assignment is read by 9/7/10 (Tuesday)

8/30

"C" Week

In small groups of 2-3, consider and record 3-4 higher level thinking questions.

Create a name tag for your character.

Homework--make sure you have at least three to four textual quotations to use in defense of your character.

Crime and Punishment

character analysis

In-class essay over Summer Reading will be held on Wed or Thursday, depending on Tuesday's program.

8/27
Crime & Punishment Character Analysis--brief discussion and time to work in class.

Please make a large name-tag for Tuesday's show; this may save us from stumbling over multiple Russian names. I have materials if you'd like to use them in class on Monday.

Please have your final 2 page character analysis for Monday. Print two copies and turn one into me. The other you may use to prepare for Tuesday's episode of Raskolnikov's guest appearance on Dr. Phil. Remember to come in character on Tuesday.

In-class essay over Summer Reading will be held on Wed or Thursday, depending on Tuesday's program.
8/26
In preparation for small group discussion, create a few questions to discuss with the class.
Small group discussion over Lying Awake & debate the choice she made to resolve her dilemma.

Please nominate a secretary to take copious notes over small group discussion. We'll post these to the website for those AP students attending the freshmen retreat.

7th Hour Discussion Lying Awake

5th Hour Discussion Lying Awake

Homework--Crime and Punishment character analysis due Monday, 8/30. Please bring two copies to class: one to turn in and one for you to keep to practice. The production of Dr. Phil will be on Tuesday.

Crime and Punishment assignment--listen to directions carefully, sign up for your character and begin working on your character analysis. Final draft due Monday, 8/30.

8/25
Please bring Lying Awake to class today.

JT--1)Make as many inferences as you can about the title. Look up the denotative/connotative meaning of "lying." Make connections to the text.
2)Find a particularly moving or beautifully written passage from Mark Salzman's Lying Awake . Carefully read, paraphrase, and discuss its signficance to the rest of the work.

Sign up for the C&P character. Go over instructions (see long-term column to the right).

Continue Lying Awake discussion.

Create small groups of 3-4. Define Sister John's main conflict. Clarify her struggle with examples from the text. Write a list of pros/cons.

Debate her decision--constructive discussion on whether or not she made the right choice.

Crime and Punishment assignment--listen to directions carefully, sign up for your character and begin working on your character analysis. Final draft due Monday, 8/30.

8/24
Summer R.Q. over Crime and Punishment

No homework tonight--enjoy, this is a rare occurrence.
SR reading quiz
Bring your summer reading books to class this week and next.
8/23
"B"
If you
are
absent
today,
make-
up quiz will be
tomorrow
during
lunch/SH
Happy Monday.

Reading Quiz over Lying Awake

Homework--review C&P. Bring your book to class with you tomorrow, and I'll let you know tomorrow if you can use it. You may use the Russian handout on names.
Please bring the two summer reading novels to class the rest of this week and next.

Also, turn in the abridged Course Expectations and Syllabus page with your signature and a parent's signature by Tuesday, 8/24.

Summer Reading Quizzes:

Tuesday: HTRLLP & Crime and Punishment
8/20
JT--Exchange your goals response with a partner, read, and discuss briefly.

Find a poignant passage in one of your summer reading novels. Carefully re-read, summarize, and record its relevance to the rest of the work.
Also, record a higher level thinking question for discussion.
Goals response
Summer Reading Quizzes:
Monday: HTRLLP & Lying Awake
Tuesday: HTRLLP & Crime and Punishment

Go over my classroom expectations with your parents & turn in signature sheet by Tuesday, 8/24

Please bring all your summer reading books to class for the next two weeks.
8/18
JT--"I write; therefore I am"
What does this mean to you?
Why read literature? Record all responses.

Create small groups of 2-3 and share your answers. Please introduce yourself first.
Consolidate and share with the class.

Look at the "why read literature?" questions and try to condense your response to 20 characters or less.

Website introduction, syllabus, answer garden.

AP Writing Homework--in a typed one page response, record your goals for this class, this year. What are your weaknesses, your strengths, concerns? Ultimately, where do you see yourself in a year or two? (Do not, however, let senioritis set in now!) You may include a question over the summer reading (& if there's time, we'll try to cover).

Necessary school supplies:

  • 1" binder for this class (optional)
  • notebook/composition notebook
  • loose-leaf notebook paper (college rule preferred)
  • blue &/or black pens
  • post-it-notes (optional)
Summer Reading Quizzes:**
Monday: HTRLLP & Lying Awake
Tuesday: HTRLLP & Crime and Punishment

Go over my classroom expectations with your parents & turn in signature sheet by Tuesday, 8/24